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People cover their faces with masks to avoid thick smog in New Delhi on Nov. 5. People living there have complained about respiratory problems. Raj K Raj/Hindustan Times/Getty Images hide caption

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Raj K Raj/Hindustan Times/Getty Images

Lawmakers and civil rights groups are pressuring tech companies to come up with detailed policies about how to combat potential misinformation and disinformation about the 2020 census. Denis Charlet/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Denis Charlet/AFP via Getty Images

Twitter will stop running political ads, CEO Jack Dorsey announced Wednesday. Online political ads pose "significant risks to politics," he tweeted. Denis Charlet/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Denis Charlet/AFP/Getty Images

Twitter To Halt Political Ads, In Contrast To Facebook

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In 2018, Twitter released an archive of thousands of accounts that the platform determined were involved in potentially state-backed information campaigns. Since then, it has continued to make announcements of its efforts to remove accounts spreading disinformation. Denis Charlet/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Denis Charlet/AFP/Getty Images

Sen. Josh Hawley has made it a point to challenge the major tech companies since his election in 2018, and tech regulation was a facet of his career as Missouri's attorney general. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

President Trump speaks during a "Presidential Social Media Summit" in the East Room of the White House on Thursday. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Trump To Invite Social Media Companies To 'Big Meeting' To Discuss Censorship

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On Tuesday, a federal appeals court upheld a lower court's ruling that President Trump cannot block people he disagrees with from his Twitter account. Above, Trump's Twitter feed is seen on June 27. J. David Ake/AP hide caption

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J. David Ake/AP

A sample of the new warning notices that Twitter users will see before clicking to see tweets by government officials and political figures that violate Twitter's rules. Twitter hide caption

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