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A screenshot of Backpage.com says federal law enforcement authorities seized the website as part of an enforcement action by the FBI and other agencies. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

From right: Kent Walker, vice president and general counsel with Google Inc.; Colin Stretch, general counsel with Facebook Inc.; and Sean Edgett, acting general counsel with Twitter Inc., swear in to a House Intelligence Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., on Nov. 1, 2017. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Nasdaq composite index, which includes many tech stocks, has lost nearly 7 percent since March 12. Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images

Tech Stocks Have Lost Some Of Their Luster, Dragging The Stock Market Lower

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When patients connect online, they often share information that reveals how treatments work in the real world. Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Mark Zuckerberg, CEO and founder of Facebook Inc., attends a conference in Idaho in July 2017. Zuckerberg has announced — and celebrated — a drop in the amount of time users are spending on Facebook. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg laughs as he meets with a group of entrepreneurs and innovators during a roundtable discussion at Cortex Innovation Community technology hub, in November, in St. Louis. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Apple is being urged to help protect young users of its smartphones and tablets, with two investors citing problems that have been linked with spending too much time on social media and looking at screens. Matthias Balk/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Matthias Balk/AFP/Getty Images

In the lingo of online dating, submarining begins when someone with whom you have romantic involvement ghosts — or disappears from your life without notice — only to resurface with no apology. Hanna Barczyk for NPR hide caption

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Hanna Barczyk for NPR

Prince Harry interviewed former President Barack Obama in a broadcast that aired Wednesday on the BBC. The interview was recorded during September's Invictus Games in Toronto, where the two are pictured here. Chris Jackson/Getty Images for the Invictus Games Foundation hide caption

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Chris Jackson/Getty Images for the Invictus Games Foundation
LA Johnson/NPR

Deciding At What Age To Give A Kid A Smartphone

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Dr. Jerad Gardner (right) and Dr. Pembe Oltulu, a pathologist from Konya, Turkey. They'd connected over Facebook. She flew to Istanbul for a real-life meeting when Gardner had a layover at the airport on a trip to meet a sarcoma patient he'd learned about on the social media platform. Jerad Gardner hide caption

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Jerad Gardner

Prawnche Ngaditowo, 29, is a food blogger and Instagram enthusiast known online as "foodventurer." Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Indonesian Food Blogger: The Unifying Power Of Cuisine And Social Media

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Anas Modamani speaks to the media Feb. 6 in Wuerzburg, Germany, after a court session about his lawsuit against Facebook. Modamani's suit, regarding the misuse of a selfie he took of himself with German Chancellor Angela Merkel was rejected, but his lawyer Lawyer Chan-Jo Jun, right, says that under a new law a lawsuit might not even have been necessary. Thomas Lohnes/Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Lohnes/Getty Images

With Huge Fines, German Law Pushes Social Networks To Delete Abusive Posts

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Prisons of Our Own Making

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