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When Social Media Fuels Gang Violence

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Teenage girls gather in August outside an ice cream shop in Portland, Ore. A new Pew Research Center study finds that while teens use social media and other digital tools in all aspects of their romantic relationships, most still initially meet — and break up with — their love interests face-to-face. Beth Nakamura/The Oregonian/Landov hide caption

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Beth Nakamura/The Oregonian/Landov

We Need 2 Talk: Most Teens Still Start, End Their Relationships Offline

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This thumbs up or "like" icon at the Facebook main campus in Menlo Park, Calif., may soon have a neighbor. Founder Mark Zuckerberg said Tuesday that the social network soon would test a long-requested "dislike" type of button. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

Ousted Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott's fondness for eating raw onions has inspired a social media campaign: #Putoutyouronions. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

Abdullah Kurdi, father of 3-year-old Aylan and his brother, Galip, age 5, whose drowned bodies both washed up on a Turkish beach. Mehmet Can Meral/AP hide caption

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Mehmet Can Meral/AP

New Hampshire voters can take selfies, not only with their favorite candidates but with ballots marked for their favorite candidates. A federal judge has knocked down a ban on "ballot selfies." Cheryl Senter/AP hide caption

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Cheryl Senter/AP

Screen shot of a Yik Yak exchange where one person expresses thoughts about possibly hurting him/herself, and others respond. Samantha Braver hide caption

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Samantha Braver

On College Campuses, Suicide Intervention Via Anonymous App

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