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People at Rancho Bernardo Community Presbyterian Church in San Diego attend a prayer and candlelight vigil for victims of the synagogue shooting in Poway, Calif., on Saturday. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Site's Ties To Shootings Renew Debate Over Internet's Role In Radicalizing Extremists

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New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern speaks to reporters at a news conference on Wednesday. She announced New Zealand and France will lead a global effort to end the use of social media as a tool to promote terrorism. Phil Walter/Getty Images hide caption

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Phil Walter/Getty Images

Australian Attorney General Christian Porter (left) and Minister for Communications Mitch Fifield hold a press conference in Canberra. Australia's parliament has passed legislation punishing Internet platforms for failing to remove violent audio and video. Mick Tsikas/AP hide caption

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Mick Tsikas/AP

An election campaign billboard in Tel Aviv shows Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu with his close ally President Trump. Seeking re-election under a cloud of criminal investigations, analysts say Netanyahu has been channeling a Trump-style approach, with an angry campaign against perceived domestic enemies. Ariel Schalit/AP hide caption

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Ariel Schalit/AP

With repair costs mounting, Air Devil's Inn owner Kristie Shockley wasn't sure the bar would make it through the summer, so she put out a call for help on social media — and some regulars planned a benefit. Ashlie Stevens/WFPL hide caption

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Ashlie Stevens/WFPL

An increasing body of research has documented the addictive nature of social media. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

In An Increasingly Polarized America, Is It Possible To Be Civil On Social Media?

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Instagram has increasingly become a home for hate speech and extremist content, according to Taylor Lorenz, a reporter for The Atlantic. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Instagram Has A Problem With Hate Speech And Extremism, 'Atlantic' Reporter Says

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Members of the rock group Four O'clock Heroes, performing in 2011, used MySpace to promote their work. The social network may have lost millions of media files uploaded by users. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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Paul Sakuma/AP
Ariel Davis for NPR

Anger Can Be Contagious — Here's How To Stop The Spread

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A Russian sailor checks his smartphone aboard a warship while supervising visitors during Russian Navy day at the Vistula lagoon in Baltiysk, Russia, in 2016. On Tuesday, Russian lawmakers passed a bill restricting service members from using smartphones. Andrey Rudakov/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrey Rudakov/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testified before Senate committees in April. But he hasn't appeared before British Parliament, despite its requests for him to do so. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images