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A month after Hurricane Dorian devastated the Bahamas, Sherrine Petit Homme LaFrance gets a hug from husband Ferrier Petit Homme. The storm destroyed their home on Grand Abaco Island. They are now living with China Laguerre in Nassau. Cheryl Diaz Meyer for NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Diaz Meyer for NPR

Five Americans and several other men were arrested after police discovered they were carrying a number of automatic rifles and pistols in Port-au-Prince. The men are being held at this Haitian National Police compound. Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images

Arrest Of Heavily Armed Former U.S. Military Members In Haiti Sparks Many Questions

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Haitian police have struggled to control street protests as demonstrators call for President Jovenel Moise to resign over alleged misuse of the Petrocaribe fund. Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images

View of the entrance of the Oxfam offices in the commune of Petion Ville, in Port-au-Prince, last week. The British charity has come under sharp criticism for its handling of misconduct allegations against staff members accused of using prostitutes in Haiti following a devastating 2010 earthquake. Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images

Penny Lawrence at Oxfam House in Oxford, in 2016. Lawrence, who was the U.K. charity's deputy chief executive, stepped down Monday amid a growing scandal over aid workers who paid for sex in Haiti and Chad. Charlotte Ball / Oxfam/Charlotte Ball / Oxfam hide caption

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Charlotte Ball / Oxfam/Charlotte Ball / Oxfam

A family from Haiti approach a tent in Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle, Quebec, stationed by Royal Canadian Mounted Police, as they haul their luggage down Roxham Road in Champlain, N.Y., last August. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

Victoria Falls sits on the border between Zambia and Zimbabwe. Photos of beautiful scenes from Africa and Haiti have been flooding the Internet in response to President Trump's reported slur. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

President Trump listens as Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg speaks at a joint news conference Wednesday. At an Oval Office meeting on immigration policy, Trump said the U.S. should want more people from countries like Norway, disparaging Haiti and what he called "shithole countries" in Africa. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

'Racist' And 'Shameful': How Other Countries Are Responding To Trump's Slur

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A White House statement issued Thursday notably did not deny that President Trump used the vulgarity to refer to African countries, but Friday morning, Trump wrote: "This was not the language used." Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

President Donald Trump listens during a meeting with lawmakers on immigration policy in the Cabinet Room of the White House on Tuesday, where he reportedly made the controversial remarks. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP