Google Google
Stories About

Google

Google is facing a class-action lawsuit filed by women who allege systemic underpayment. And the Department of Labor is investigating whether Google pays women less. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Tech giant Google, whose headquarters is in Mountain View, Calif., plans to build a campus in nearby San Jose. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

This City Told Amazon And Google: No Incentives For You

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/695156096/695536903" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Absher app, available in the Apple and Google apps stores in Saudi Arabia, allows men to track the whereabouts of their wives and daughters. Apple App Store/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Apple App Store/Screenshot by NPR

Gizmodo's Kashmir Hill tried to disconnect from all Amazon products, including smart speakers, as part of a bigger experiment in living without the major tech players. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Chiu/AP

Why We Can't Break Up With Big Tech

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/692877140/693109037" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Facebook has been paying young users as young as 13 years old up to $20 a month to install an app called Facebook Research, TechCrunch reported. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

Facebook, Google Draw Scrutiny Over Apps That Collected Data From Teens

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/690172103/690230774" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Men use tablets and laptops to check news at a coffee shop in Hanoi in 2014. Today almost half of Vietnam's population of over 95 million have access to the Internet. A new and controversial cybersecurity law goes into effect nationwide Tuesday. Hoang Dinh Nam/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Hoang Dinh Nam/AFP/Getty Images

Google says it will lease office space at three spots in the West Village to create a new campus for thousands of workers in New York City. Here, a pedestrian passes by 345 Hudson Street, one of the buildings Google will be using. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

A security guard stands in front of Google's booth at the China International Import Expo earlier this month in Shanghai. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

'We're Taking A Stand': Google Workers Protest Plans For Censored Search In China

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/671123903/671162218" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

People participate in a walkout at the Google office in Zurich on Thursday. @tedonprivacy via Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
@tedonprivacy via Reuters

Google Employees Walk Out To Protest Company's Treatment Of Women

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/662851489/662902970" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg and Twitter Chief Executive Officer Jack Dorsey testify during a Senate intelligence committee hearing on Sept. 5. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

People walk into the cafeteria at Facebook's main campus in Menlo Park, Calif., May 15, 2012. ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images

For Some Facebook Employees, Free Food Is Coming To An End

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/637817855/638018064" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sen. Orrin Hatch's social media team offered many examples of "proof of life" on Monday night. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Orrin Hatch Would Like You To Know He's Still Alive

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/631811087/632045823" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

European Union Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager held a joint news conference at EU headquarters in Brussels on Wednesday after slapping a record $5 billion antitrust penalty on the U.S. tech giant. John Thys/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Thys/AFP/Getty Images

A 360-degree camera is used to document the Khe Min Ga Zedi temple in Bagan, Myanmar. Kieran Kesner for CyArk hide caption

toggle caption
Kieran Kesner for CyArk

3D Scans Help Preserve History, But Who Should Own Them?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/609084578/613117655" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Google CEO Sundar Pichai demonstrated new AI technology that can use human-like speech to carry on phone conversations at the Google I/O 2018 Conference on Tuesday in Mountain View, Calif. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

From right: Kent Walker, vice president and general counsel with Google Inc.; Colin Stretch, general counsel with Facebook Inc.; and Sean Edgett, acting general counsel with Twitter Inc., swear in to a House Intelligence Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., on Nov. 1, 2017. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images