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Google is looking to artificial intelligence as a way to make a mark in health care. Michael Short/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Short/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Google Searches For Ways To Put Artificial Intelligence To Use In Health Care

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Evaldas Rimasauskas pleaded guilty to wire fraud charges on Wednesday for his part in orchestrating a scheme to swindle Google and Facebook out of more than $100 million. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

European Commissioner for Competition Margrethe Vestager says Google broke the law for roughly 10 years by restricting how business partners deal with rivals in search advertising. Yves Herman/Reuters hide caption

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Yves Herman/Reuters

After years of light regulation, the tech industry is coming under scrutiny from Congress and regulators due to a series of privacy breaches. Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images

Targeting Online Privacy, Congress Sets A New Tone With Big Tech

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Kate Klonick, assistant professor of law at St. John's University, gave her students an optional assignment for spring break: Try to identify a stranger based solely on what they reveal in public. Above, strangers commuting in London. Classen Rafael / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Classen Rafael / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

Googling Strangers: One Professor's Lesson On Privacy In Public Spaces

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Google is facing a class-action lawsuit filed by women who allege systemic underpayment. And the Department of Labor is investigating whether Google pays women less. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Tech giant Google, whose headquarters is in Mountain View, Calif., plans to build a campus in nearby San Jose. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

This City Told Amazon And Google: No Incentives For You

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The Absher app, available in the Apple and Google apps stores in Saudi Arabia, allows men to track the whereabouts of their wives and daughters. Apple App Store/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Apple App Store/Screenshot by NPR

Gizmodo's Kashmir Hill tried to disconnect from all Amazon products, including smart speakers, as part of a bigger experiment in living without the major tech players. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Why We Can't Break Up With Big Tech

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Facebook has been paying young users as young as 13 years old up to $20 a month to install an app called Facebook Research, TechCrunch reported. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

Facebook, Google Draw Scrutiny Over Apps That Collected Data From Teens

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Men use tablets and laptops to check news at a coffee shop in Hanoi in 2014. Today almost half of Vietnam's population of over 95 million have access to the Internet. A new and controversial cybersecurity law goes into effect nationwide Tuesday. Hoang Dinh Nam/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hoang Dinh Nam/AFP/Getty Images

Google says it will lease office space at three spots in the West Village to create a new campus for thousands of workers in New York City. Here, a pedestrian passes by 345 Hudson Street, one of the buildings Google will be using. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

A security guard stands in front of Google's booth at the China International Import Expo earlier this month in Shanghai. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

'We're Taking A Stand': Google Workers Protest Plans For Censored Search In China

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People participate in a walkout at the Google office in Zurich on Thursday. @tedonprivacy via Reuters hide caption

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@tedonprivacy via Reuters

Google Employees Walk Out To Protest Company's Treatment Of Women

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Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg and Twitter Chief Executive Officer Jack Dorsey testify during a Senate intelligence committee hearing on Sept. 5. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images