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Nick Ayers (from left), adviser to the vice president; Brad Parscale, President Trump's digital and data director; David Bossie, deputy campaign manager; and Katrina Pierson, who served on the campaign's communications team. Drew Angerer/Getty Images (2); Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AFP/Getty Images; Darren McCollester/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images (2); Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AFP/Getty Images; Darren McCollester/Getty Images

Many groups are raising questions about President Trump's conflicts of interest, but do they have the "standing" to challenge him in court? Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Can Groups Sue Over Trump's Business Conflicts Even If They Weren't Harmed?

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Walter Shaub Jr. is the director of the U.S. Office of Government Ethics, which has tweeted about President-elect Donald Trump's potential conflicts of interest — and ethics. U.S. Office of Government Ethics hide caption

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U.S. Office of Government Ethics

President-elect Donald Trump is expected to hold a news conference on Jan. 11 to address conflicts of interest, though an adviser said the date might shift. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Prominent Trump Backers Sign Letter Pushing To End Conflicts Of Interest

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Walter Shaub Jr. is the director of the U.S. Office of Government Ethics, which tweeted last month about President-elect Donald Trump's conflicts of interest. U.S. Office of Government Ethics hide caption

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U.S. Office of Government Ethics

U.S. Ethics Chief Was Behind Those Tweets About Trump, Records Show

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Molecular markers show structures and cell types within a human embryo, shown here 12 days after fertilization. The epiblast, for example, appears in green. Gist Croft, Alessia Deglincerti, and Ali H. Brivanlou/The Rockefeller University hide caption

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Gist Croft, Alessia Deglincerti, and Ali H. Brivanlou/The Rockefeller University

Advance In Human Embryo Research Rekindles Ethical Debate

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Google's self-driving prototype car can be found cruising the streets near the Internet company's Silicon Valley headquarters to test programming responses to a variety of situations. Tony Avelar/AP hide caption

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Tony Avelar/AP

A surgical team at Sooam Biotech in Seoul, South Korea, injects cloned embryos into the uterus of an anesthetized dog. Rob Stein/NPR hide caption

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Rob Stein/NPR

Disgraced Scientist Clones Dogs, And Critics Question His Intent

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