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Immature human eggs (pink) were created by Japanese researchers using stem cells that were derived from blood cells. Courtesy of Saitou Lab hide caption

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Courtesy of Saitou Lab

Scientists Create Immature Human Eggs From Stem Cells

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Microplastics found along Lake Ontario by Rochman's team Chris Joyce/NPR hide caption

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Chris Joyce/NPR

Beer, Drinking Water And Fish: Tiny Plastic Is Everywhere

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Flaws in a study of the Mediterranean diet led to a softening of its conclusions about health benefits. But don't switch to a diet of cotton candy just yet. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

Scientists tagged over 30 great white sharks last fall — more than they had ever done in a single season. Courtesy Stanford University — Block Lab Hopkins Marine Station hide caption

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Courtesy Stanford University — Block Lab Hopkins Marine Station

Great White Sharks Have A Secret 'Cafe,' And They Led Scientists Right To It

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Plaques located in the gray matter of the brain are key indicators of Alzheimer's disease. Cecil Fox/Science Source hide caption

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Cecil Fox/Science Source

Scientists Push Plan To Change How Researchers Define Alzheimer's

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Melodie Beckham (left), here with her daughter, Laura, had metastatic lung cancer and chose to stop taking medical marijuana after it failed to relieve her symptoms. She died a few weeks after this photo was taken. Melissa Bailey/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Melissa Bailey/Kaiser Health News

Dr. Robert Redfield, named CDC director Wednesday, spoke during the Aid for AIDS "My Hero Gala" in New York City in 2013. Craig Barritt/Getty Images for Aid for Aids/Getty Images hide caption

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Craig Barritt/Getty Images for Aid for Aids/Getty Images

Brain MRI BSIP/Collection Mix: Sub/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/Collection Mix: Sub/Getty Images

A Tiny Pulse Of Electricity Can Help The Brain Form Lasting Memories

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A virtual reality program developed by NASA could help scientists visualize the magnetic fields around the earth. NASA hide caption

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NASA

NASA Taps Young People To Help Develop Virtual Reality Technology

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The Agriculture Department established research centers in 2014 to translate climate science into real-world ideas to help farmers and ranchers adapt to a hotter climate. But a tone of skepticism about climate change from the Trump administration has some farmers worried that this research they rely on may now be in jeopardy. Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

Editing human genes that would be passed on for generations could make sense if the diseases are serious and the right safeguards are in places, a scientific panel says. Claude Edelmann/Science Source hide caption

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Claude Edelmann/Science Source

Scientific Panel Says Editing Heritable Human Genes Could Be OK In The Future

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Jonathan Coleman and his son compare graphene-infused Silly Putty (left) with the unadulterated kids stuff. Naoise Culhane/Amber Center, Trinity College Dublin hide caption

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Naoise Culhane/Amber Center, Trinity College Dublin

Adding A Funny Form Of Carbon To Silly Putty Creates A Heart Monitor

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The federal government spends more than $30 billion a year to fund the National Institutes of Health. What changes are in store under a new administration? NIH/Flickr hide caption

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NIH/Flickr
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