research : Shots - Health News research
Stories About

research

Skeletal muscle cells from a rabbit were stained with fluorescent markers to highlight cell nuclei (blue) and proteins in the cytoskeleton (red and green). Daniel Schroen, Cell Applications Inc./Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Schroen, Cell Applications Inc./Science Source

The reasons for why Americans and Canadians choose to tweet differently is difficult to determine. Cameron Pollack/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Cameron Pollack/NPR

Study Shows Americans Are Meaner On Twitter Than Canadians

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/672817706/672817707" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People who are sensitive to the bitterness of caffeine tend to drink more coffee than others, while people sensitive to bitter flavors like quinine drink less coffee, according to a new study. Dimitri Otis/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Dimitri Otis/Getty Images

A 291-day-old retina. Our ability to see colors develops in the womb. Now scientists have replicated that process, which could help accelerate efforts to cure colorblindness and lead to new treatments for diseases. Johns Hopkins University hide caption

toggle caption
Johns Hopkins University

Human Retinas Grown In A Dish Reveal Origin Of Color Vision

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/656560767/656682256" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The New England Aquarium team searching for right whales, at sunrise in the Bay of Fundy. Johanna Anderson and Kelsey Howe scan the waters while Marianna Hagbloom logs data, Amy Knowlton adjusts a GPS unit, and Brigid McKenna steers the Nereid. Murray Carpenter for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Murray Carpenter for NPR

In Changing Climate, Endangered Right Whales Find New Feeding Grounds

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/652281781/655732019" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Immature human eggs (pink) were created by Japanese researchers using stem cells that were derived from blood cells. Courtesy of Saitou Lab hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Saitou Lab

Scientists Create Immature Human Eggs From Stem Cells

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/649552734/650052907" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Microplastics found along Lake Ontario by Rochman's team Chris Joyce/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Chris Joyce/NPR

Beer, Drinking Water And Fish: Tiny Plastic Is Everywhere

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/636845604/640329327" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Flaws in a study of the Mediterranean diet led to a softening of its conclusions about health benefits. But don't switch to a diet of cotton candy just yet. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Westend61/Getty Images

Scientists tagged over 30 great white sharks last fall — more than they had ever done in a single season. Courtesy Stanford University — Block Lab Hopkins Marine Station hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy Stanford University — Block Lab Hopkins Marine Station

Great White Sharks Have A Secret 'Cafe,' And They Led Scientists Right To It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/613394086/614935614" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Plaques located in the gray matter of the brain are key indicators of Alzheimer's disease. Cecil Fox/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Cecil Fox/Science Source

Scientists Push Plan To Change How Researchers Define Alzheimer's

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/600944750/601072306" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Melodie Beckham (left), here with her daughter, Laura, had metastatic lung cancer and chose to stop taking medical marijuana after it failed to relieve her symptoms. She died a few weeks after this photo was taken. Melissa Bailey/Kaiser Health News hide caption

toggle caption
Melissa Bailey/Kaiser Health News

Dr. Robert Redfield, named CDC director Wednesday, spoke during the Aid for AIDS "My Hero Gala" in New York City in 2013. Craig Barritt/Getty Images for Aid for Aids/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Craig Barritt/Getty Images for Aid for Aids/Getty Images

Brain MRI BSIP/Collection Mix: Sub/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
BSIP/Collection Mix: Sub/Getty Images

A Tiny Pulse Of Electricity Can Help The Brain Form Lasting Memories

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/583633391/583778487" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A virtual reality program developed by NASA could help scientists visualize the magnetic fields around the earth. NASA hide caption

toggle caption
NASA

NASA Taps Young People To Help Develop Virtual Reality Technology

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/565673749/566326452" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Agriculture Department established research centers in 2014 to translate climate science into real-world ideas to help farmers and ranchers adapt to a hotter climate. But a tone of skepticism about climate change from the Trump administration has some farmers worried that this research they rely on may now be in jeopardy. Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media hide caption

toggle caption
Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

Editing human genes that would be passed on for generations could make sense if the diseases are serious and the right safeguards are in places, a scientific panel says. Claude Edelmann/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Claude Edelmann/Science Source

Scientific Panel Says Editing Heritable Human Genes Could Be OK In The Future

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/514580162/515242382" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Stories About

research