Barack Obama Barack Obama

First lady Nancy Reagan sits on the knee of Mr. T, dressed as Santa Claus, and gives him a peck on the head, as he joined her for a preview of the White House Christmas decor in 1983. Ira Schwarz/AP hide caption

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Ira Schwarz/AP

(Left to right) Don Gettys, Margie Orr, Sarah Block Yacoviello and Cal Weary. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

'York Project' Revisited: 2008 Voters Weigh In On 2016 Race

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George W. Bush holds a press conference Dec. 17, 2000, where he named Alberto Gonzales chief White House lawyer, Condoleezza Rice (next to Bush) national security adviser and Karen Hughes (far right) counselor. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

President-Elect Trump Breaks With Long History Of Press Conferences

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The York Project, a series of stories that aired on NPR in 2008, about race and the election. David Deal/NPR hide caption

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David Deal/NPR

'York Project' Revisited: NPR Catches Up With Four 2008 Voters

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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks July 16 in New York City. The president-elect's Twitter habit could run up against cybersecurity recommendations once he's in office — but he may also choose to disregard that advice to keep his direct channel to the public open. Bryan Thomas/Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan Thomas/Getty Images

What Will Trump's Twitter Strategy Be When He Becomes President?

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President Obama meets with members of his national security team and cybersecurity advisers in February. Homeland security adviser Lisa Monaco and Office of Management and Budget Director Shaun Donovan are at right. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

This year's White House Gingerbread House is made with 150 pounds of gingerbread, 100 pounds of bread dough, 20 pounds of gum paste, 20 pounds of icing and 20 pounds of sculpted sugar pieces. It also features both the East and West Wings. Raquel Zaldivar/NPR hide caption

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Raquel Zaldivar/NPR

For The Holidays, The Obamas Open Up The White House One Last Time

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Vendors congregated outside a rally for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump at the Indiana Theater on May 1, 2016 in Terre Haute, Indiana. Charles Ledford/Getty Images hide caption

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This Bellwether Has Picked The Winning Presidential Candidate Since The 1890s

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David Remnick is the editor of The New Yorker, where his latest piece is based on his interviews with President Obama during the time leading up to the election, and the days after. Thos Robinson/Getty Images for The New Yorker hide caption

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Thos Robinson/Getty Images for The New Yorker

New Yorker Editor David Remnick Describes Obama's Reactions To Election

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Hillary Clinton has the edge. But Donald Trump has a path, albeit a narrow one. A tie would go to the House, which is controlled by the GOP and would pick the next president. Alyson Hurt and Domenico Montanaro/NPR hide caption

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Alyson Hurt and Domenico Montanaro/NPR