journalism journalism

With an opioid addiction crisis that shows no sign of abating, how we describe addiction and dependence matters. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Hero Images/Getty Images

Tavon Tanner tears up before his surgery at Lurie Children's Hospital in October 2016. This photograph is part of the Chicago Tribune series that earned E. Jason Wambsgans the 2017 Pulitzer Prize. E. Jason Wambsgans/Chicago Tribune/Courtesy of Columbia University hide caption

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E. Jason Wambsgans/Chicago Tribune/Courtesy of Columbia University

Students Gina Mathew (from left), Kali Poenitske, Maddie Baden, Trina Paul, Connor Balthazor and Patrick Sullivan at Pittsburg High School in Pittsburg, Kan. When reporters for the student newspaper there dug into the credentials offered by their new principal, they found issues that led to her resignation. Courtesy of Emily Smith/Pittsburg High School hide caption

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Courtesy of Emily Smith/Pittsburg High School

Kansas Student Newspaper's Fact Check Results In New Principal's Resignation

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A video of NPR Beijing correspondent Anthony Kuhn asking a question about a policy to expand the Beijing region got 5 million views on Weibo, China's answer to Twitter. CCTV hide caption

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CCTV

Anas Modamani, a refugee from Syria who posed for a selfie with German Chancellor Angela Merkel in 2015, sued Facebook after his photo was shared in posts falsely accusing him of being a criminal and terrorist. This week, he lost his case in court. Some lawmakers argue that cases like this prove there's a need for new, tougher libel laws. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

In A Crucial Election Year, Worries Grow In Germany About Fake News

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The podium where Donald Trump would take the Oath of Office is covered on Jan. 19. Trump promised to govern transparently, but open-government advocates are seeing troubling early signs. Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images

Transparency Advocates Fear Trump Officials Will Block Flow of Information to Public

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Actress Mary Tyler Moore filming First You Cry in 1978 in New York City. Marty Lederhandler/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Marty Lederhandler/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Remembering Mary Tyler Moore, Whose Sunny Smile Masked Steel

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Journalists work in the Trump campaign's designated media pen as they wait for the candidate to arrive at a town hall meeting on March 14 in Tampa, Fla. Foreign journalists covering the campaign say gaining official access to Trump events has been more challenging than to Hillary Clinton's. Brian Blanco/Getty Images hide caption

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Brian Blanco/Getty Images

Jeffrey Goldberg was named as The Atlantic's new top editor earlier this month. Lynn Goldsmith hide caption

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Lynn Goldsmith

Atlantic Editor On Acrimony In U.S.: 'I Have To Imagine That It Actually Gets Worse'

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Russia and China were among the 10 countries voting against the press freedom group's application for U.N. credentials. But South Africa indicated on Friday that it would reverse its "no" vote. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

U.N. Panel Blocks Accreditation Bid By Committee To Protect Journalists

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University of Missouri students circle tents on the Carnahan Quadrangle, locking arms to prevent media from entering the space following the resignation of President Timothy Wolfe on Monday. Robert Cohen/TNS/Landov hide caption

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Robert Cohen/TNS/Landov