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A People's Liberation Army tank sits below a portrait of Mao Zedong at the Gate of Heavenly Peace in Beijing on June 11, 1989, one week after the crackdown on protesters at Tiananmen Square. Sadayuki Mikami/AP hide caption

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Sadayuki Mikami/AP

'Bearing Witness Is Really All We Have': Memories Of Covering The Tiananmen Aftermath

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The photos of five people slain in the Capital Gazette newsroom adorn candles at a vigil in June. The attack was mentioned in the analysis of Reporters Without Borders' annual World Press Freedom Index. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

A copy of the final edition of the Rocky Mountain News sits in a newspaper box on a street corner in Denver, Colorado. John Moore/John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/John Moore/Getty Images

Stop The Presses! Newspapers Affect Us, Often In Ways We Don't Realize

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Five wooden markers stand in a makeshift memorial outside the Annapolis Capitol Gazette offices in Annapolis, Md., in early July, honoring the employees killed by a gunman just days before. The victims were editor Gerald Fischman, 61; editor and columnist Rob Hiaasen, 59; reporter and editor John McNamara, 56; reporter and columnist Wendi Winters, 65; and sales assistant Rebecca Smith, 34. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

On Dec. 3, 2013, Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger faced questions from the British Parliament about his newspaper's decision to publish material leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden. Oli Scarff/Getty Images hide caption

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Oli Scarff/Getty Images

Former 'Guardian' Editor On Snowden, WikiLeaks And Remaking Journalism

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This undated image from video provided by TV Ruse shows journalist Viktoria Marinova in Bulgaria. On Tuesday, officials announced an arrest had been made in connection with her death on Saturday. AP hide caption

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AP

A woman holds a candle next to a portrait of slain journalist Viktoria Marinova during a vigil at the Monument of Liberty in Ruse, Bulgaria, on Monday. Vadim Ghirda/AP hide caption

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Vadim Ghirda/AP

A blocked road in Istanbul leads to the Saudi consulate. Jamal Khashoggi, a prominent critic of Saudi Arabia's crown prince, visited the consulate earlier this week and has not been seen since. Emrah Gurel/AP hide caption

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Emrah Gurel/AP

A.G. Sulzberger, publisher of The New York Times, met with President Trump earlier this month and implored him to "reconsider his broader attacks on journalism." Rob Kim/Getty Images hide caption

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Rob Kim/Getty Images

In the White House briefing room, Sarah Sanders often moves quickly from one news outlet to the next, cutting off follow-up questions and ending press conferences with many reporters' questions unanswered. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

In The White House Press Room, Sarah Sanders Channels President Trump

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Nora Carol Photography/Nora Carol Photography/AFP/Getty Images

Fake News: An Origin Story

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"Women are just 32 percent of newsrooms, but the percentage of women of color is even more dire," Cristal Williams Chancellor, director of communications at the Women's Media Center, told NPR. Oivind Hovland/Getty Images hide caption

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Oivind Hovland/Getty Images

A T-shirt with the message "Rope. Tree. Journalist. SOME ASSEMBLY REQUIRED" rose to prominence days before last year's U.S. election. Until recently, it was offered for sale on Walmart's website. Screengrab of Walmart's website courtesy of RTNDA hide caption

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Screengrab of Walmart's website courtesy of RTNDA

Luo Changping, left, and Deng Fei. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

China's Few Investigative Journalists Face Increasing Challenges

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Neil Cohen, who died at age 72. One of his books, The Law of Probation and Parole, has been cited by the Supreme Court. Courtesy of Riva Nelson hide caption

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Courtesy of Riva Nelson

Remembering 'Captain' Neil Cohen, Summer Camp Counselor And Sage

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With an opioid addiction crisis that shows no sign of abating, how we describe addiction and dependence matters. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Hero Images/Getty Images