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Chevron operates a major refinery in Richmond, Calif., a community with high childhood asthma rates. It also owns the city's dominant news site, putting its own spin on events, and runs similar websites in Texas and Ecuador. Tracy J. Lee for NPR hide caption

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Tracy J. Lee for NPR

Chevron owns this city's news site. Many stories aren't told

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A priest prays over the coffin of Oleksandra "Sasha" Kuvshynova, a Ukrainian journalist killed while working for Fox News in March 2022. Her parents have sued Fox News alleging wrongful death, fraud and defamation. Efrem Lukatsky/AP hide caption

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Efrem Lukatsky/AP

Leaders of some of America's most well-known journalism schools, which include Graciela Mochkofsky (from left), David Ryfe and Jelani Cobb, weigh in on the state of the news industry and how they are making sure students are prepared to enter a turbulent business. Daniel Mordzinski, David Ryfe, Jelani Cobb hide caption

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Daniel Mordzinski, David Ryfe, Jelani Cobb

Conservative commentator Armstrong Williams is the new owner, along with David D. Smith, of The Baltimore Sun. The newspaper now features Williams' columns and stories about his broadcast interviews. Kim Hairston/The Baltimore Sun hide caption

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Kim Hairston/The Baltimore Sun

More crime and conservatism: How new owners are changing 'The Baltimore Sun'

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Lytvynova stands near an apartment building in her Kyiv neighborhood that was damaged by multiple Russian strikes over the course of the war. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Washington Post staff picket during a 24-hour strike outside the newspaper's building in December 2023. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Journalists turn to picket lines as the news business ails

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NPR's incoming CEO, Katherine Maher, speaking at Web Summit last fall. She briefly led that organization after its founder resigned following comments he made about Israel and Gaza. Armando Franca/AP hide caption

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Armando Franca/AP

NPR names tech executive Katherine Maher to lead in turbulent era

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Will Lewis speaks in July 2017, when he was the publisher of The Wall Street Journal and CEO of Dow Jones. Mike Coppola/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Coppola/Getty Images

New 'Washington Post' CEO accused of Murdoch tabloid hacking cover-up

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More than 750 Washington Post workers have agreed to walk off the job on Thursday to protest stalled contract negotiations. The company has warned of layoffs if too few staffers take voluntary buyouts. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

'Washington Post' journalists stage daylong strike under threat of job cuts

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Journalists, relatives and friends pray over the bodies of journalists Sari Mansour and Hassouna Esleem after they were killed in an Israeli bombardment at Bureij camp in the central Gaza Strip on Nov. 19. Majdi Fathi/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Majdi Fathi/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Gaza war is deadliest conflict for journalists in over 30 years, press advocates say

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A woman holds a pillow near the Al Ahli Arab Hospital in Gaza City, the site of a blast that killed hundreds on October 17. In the aftermath, Hamas and Israel traded blame. Mahmud Hams/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mahmud Hams/AFP via Getty Images

People enter The Washington Post's headquarters. The newspaper is cutting nearly 10% of its jobs through voluntary buyouts. ERIC BARADAT/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ERIC BARADAT/AFP via Getty Images

'The Washington Post' will cut 240 jobs through voluntary buyouts

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At a top Florida news site, politicians, lobbyists and consultants say they pay to secure flattering coverage. Now the founder of the site, Florida Politics, is expanding to states throughout the southeast. Tracy J. Lee for NPR hide caption

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Tracy J. Lee for NPR

Politicians say this Florida news site lets them buy coverage. Is your state next?

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Rupert Murdoch, 92, is stepping down as chair of his global media empire, which includes Fox News and The Wall Street Journal. Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images hide caption

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Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images

Fox founder Rupert Murdoch steps down from his media empire, handing it to his son

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A high school boys' soccer game. Jon C. Hancock/AP hide caption

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Jon C. Hancock/AP

Opinion: High schoolers can do what AI can't

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Journalists protest outside the offices of the Austin American Statesman in June as part of a nationwide effort by staff at Gannett-owned newspapers to draw attention to layoffs and budget cuts. A coalition of donors is promising to bolster local news with a half-billion dollars over five years. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Philanthropies pledge $500 million to address 'crisis in local news'

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NPR President and CEO John Lansing plans to step down in December, nine months before his term is set to end. Deveny Williams/Deveny Williams hide caption

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Deveny Williams/Deveny Williams

NPR CEO John Lansing will leave in December, capping a tumultuous year

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NPR has named Edith Chapin its senior vice president for news, overseeing the newsroom. She has been serving in that position on an acting basis since fall 2022. Stephen Voss/Stephen Voss hide caption

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Stephen Voss/Stephen Voss

Texas A&M University announced Friday that its school president has resigned after a Black journalist's celebrated hiring at one of the nation's largest campuses unraveled over pushback of her diversity and inclusion work. Here, the Texas A&M logo on Kyle Field is seen before an NCAA college football game against Florida, in College Station, Texas, Sept. 8, 2012. Dave Einsel/AP hide caption

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Dave Einsel/AP