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Dan Gilbert says we're not great at predicting how much we will enjoy an experience in part because we fail to consider all of the details. We think a visit to the dentist will be terrible, but we're forgetting about the free toothbrush, the nice chat with the dental hygienist and the magazines in the waiting room. Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

Dan Gilbert says we're not great at predicting how much we will enjoy an experience in part because we fail to consider all of the details. We think a visit to the dentist will be terrible, but we're forgetting about the free toothbrush, the nice chat with the dental hygienist and the magazines in the waiting room. Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

You 2.0: Why We're Bad At Predicting Our Own Happiness — And How We Can Get Better

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Dan Gilbert says we're not great at predicting how much we will enjoy an experience in part because we fail to consider all of the details. We think a visit to the dentist will be terrible — but we're forgetting about the free toothbrush, the nice chat with the dental hygienist, and the magazines in the waiting room. Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

You vs. Future You; Or Why We're Bad At Predicting Our Own Happiness

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/490972873/490985494" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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