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It seems like every kid is online. But UNICEF's director of data, Laurence Chandy, observes: "It's a huge inequity between those who have access and those who do not." Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images

Archaeologists are excavating an ancient cabin at the Rising Whale site. Cape Espenberg Birnirk Project hide caption

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Cape Espenberg Birnirk Project

How To Survive Climate Change? Clues Are Buried In The Arctic

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Taxis park along the footpath in Adelaide, Australia. Alva Noe asks: Do taxi apps make people interact less — or better — with their drivers? sasimoto/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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sasimoto/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Snapchat users can upload photos and videos onto the new Snap Map. When a topic is trending, it'll pop up on a heat map. The image above is a composite of Snapchat screen grabs. Shelby Knowles/NPR hide caption

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Shelby Knowles/NPR

Inside DARPA, The Pentagon Agency Whose Technology Has 'Changed the World'

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