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Could you say "no" to this face? Christoph Bartneck of the University of Canterbury in New Zealand recently tested whether humans could end the life of a robot as it pleaded for survival. Christoph Bartneck hide caption

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Christoph Bartneck

No Mercy For Robots: Experiment Tests How Humans Relate To Machines

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Plugged in, but not at work: Web security personnel were called in to find out how a company's network was being accessed from China. They found that an employee had outsourced his own job. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/AFP/Getty Images

The MaKey MaKey invention kit includes a plan for making a "banana piano," helping the Kickstarter project make it to the site's best-of-2012 list. Kickstarter says 2.2 million people pledged nearly $320 million in 2012. Kickstarter hide caption

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Kickstarter

The printed cup. via Shapeways hide caption

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via Shapeways

3-D Printing Is (Kind Of) A Big Deal

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Ever feel like someone is watching you? The Federal Trade Commission finds you could be right — if you've used a rental computer. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Thomas Peterffy, shown here in 2010 Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images

Episode 396: A Father Of High-Speed Trading Thinks We Should Slow Down

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