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The PharmaChk is a bit like a litmus test for drugs: You pop in a pill at one end, and in 15 minutes, a number appears on a screen telling you the drug's potency. Mahafreen H. Mistry/NPR hide caption

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Mahafreen H. Mistry/NPR

Babajide Bello of the tech company Andela takes a selfie with AOL's Steve Case after the pair played a pickup game of pingpong. Courtesy of Andela hide caption

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Courtesy of Andela

Hope Or Hype: The Revolution In Africa Will Be Wireless

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At a Minecraft camp in Shaker Heights, Ohio, kids trade secrets about making their virtual worlds come to life. Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN

Sometimes A Little More Minecraft May Be Quite All Right

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Arturo Martinez watches his wife, Aurora Martinez, put on makeup in their San Rafael, Calif., home. She has Alzheimer's. Lynne Shallcross for NPR hide caption

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Lynne Shallcross for NPR

Can Technology Ease The Burden Of Caring For People With Dementia?

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By clicking "Like" and commenting on Facebook posts, users signal the social network's algorithm that they care about something. That in turn helps influence what they see later. Algorithms like that happen all over the web — and the programs can reflect human biases. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

What Makes Algorithms Go Awry?

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A quick staff-up and a fast-paced money grab are common to both startups and campaigns. Here, staffers work at computers during a tour of President Obama's re-election headquarters in Chicago on May 12, 2010. Frank Polich/Getty Images hide caption

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Frank Polich/Getty Images

License plate scanners have helped police locate stolen vehicles and have even assisted in murder investigations. But with their ability to track a person's every move, skeptics worry about privacy. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Questions Remain About How To Use Data From License Plate Scanners

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Genevieve Bell, an anthropologist and vice president at Intel Corp., with teammate David Weinberger, senior researcher at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University. Samuel LaHoz/Intelligence Squared U.S. hide caption

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Samuel LaHoz/Intelligence Squared U.S.

A "shared" workspace at the Atlassian office. The company installed heat and motion sensors to track when and how often every desk, room and table was used. Atlassian hide caption

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Atlassian

How A Bigger Lunch Table At Work Can Boost Productivity

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Google was one of five Silicon Valley companies included in a recent study that looked at executive-level representation for Asian-Americans in the tech industry. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Listen to Part One

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Officers stand watch at the intersection of West North Avenue and Pennsylvania Avenue as protesters walk for Freddie Gray in Baltimore in April. Gray died from spinal injuries about a week after he was arrested and transported in a police van. Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Police Rethink Tactics Amid New Technologies And Social Pressure

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ResearchKit, presented by Apple's Jeff Williams in March, enables app creation to aid medical research. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

The Promise And Potential Pitfalls Of Apple's ResearchKit

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