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In this Oct. 31 photo, a man has his face painted to represent efforts to defeat facial recognition. It was during a protest at Amazon headquarters over the company's facial recognition system. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

A body camera from Taser is seen during a press conference on Sept. 24, 2014 in Washington, DC. BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images

Police Are Investing In New Technology. 'Thin Blue Lie' Asks, 'Does It Work?'

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Motherboards coordinate all the processes inside a computer. debs-eye/Flickr hide caption

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debs-eye/Flickr

Should This Exist? The Ethics Of New Technology

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

China Makes A Big Play In Silicon Valley

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NEC Corporation of America already supplies many American jurisdictions with still photo facial recognition. Now the company says it's getting law enforcement inquiries about its real-time facial recognition. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Martin Kaste/NPR

Real-Time Facial Recognition Is Available, But Will U.S. Police Buy It?

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It seems like every kid is online. But UNICEF's director of data, Laurence Chandy, observes: "It's a huge inequity between those who have access and those who do not." Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images

Archaeologists are excavating an ancient cabin at the Rising Whale site. Cape Espenberg Birnirk Project hide caption

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Cape Espenberg Birnirk Project

How To Survive Climate Change? Clues Are Buried In The Arctic

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