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Family members of Tony Hughes, one of the 11 victims found at a serial killer's apartment, comfort each other during a remembrance vigil held at Junea Park in Milwaukee in 1991. Bill Waugh/AP Photo hide caption

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Bill Waugh/AP Photo

Opinion: Remember the victims, not the killer

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Movie theaters remain closed as stay-at-home orders continue in many parts of the U.S. due to the coronavirus pandemic. Chris Pizzello/AP hide caption

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Chris Pizzello/AP

TV, Movies And Coronavirus

The coronavirus pandemic is affecting all parts of the entertainment industry. Sam talks to writer and comedian Jenny Yang and camera operator Jessica Hershatter, whose jobs are on hold due to shutdowns. Also, Sam and LA Times entertainment reporter Meredith Blake discuss television and streaming. And joining Sam for a special edition of Who Said That is Shea Serrano, staff writer for The Ringer and author of the book Movies (and Other Things).

TV, Movies And Coronavirus

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Daniel Ek, CEO of Swedish music streaming service Spotify, in Tokyo in 2016. The company is expected to go public late next month or early April. Toru Yamanaka/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Toru Yamanaka/AFP/Getty Images

Nigel Bradham of the Buffalo Bills celebrates a touchdown in the October game against Jacksonville Jaguars in London. Yahoo's online stream of the event was one of the NFL's digital tests. Alan Crowhurst/Getty Images hide caption

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Alan Crowhurst/Getty Images

Apple's senior vice president of Internet Software and Services Eddy Cue speaks about Apple Music during the keynote at the annual developers conference. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Apple Bets Big That You'll Start Paying To Stream Music

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Taylor Swift accepts the award for top artist at the Billboard Music Awards. Swift's receiving the lion's share of credit for forcing Apple to pay artists to stream their music, even during a free trial period for users. Chris Pizzello/Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP hide caption

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Chris Pizzello/Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

A new Manhattan studio joins YouTube Spaces in London, Tokyo and Los Angeles. Media analysts say YouTube hopes content produced there will ultimately get viewers to stay longer on the site. YouTube hide caption

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YouTube

Beyond Cat Videos: YouTube Bets On Production Studio 'Playgrounds'

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A new iPad app lets viewers watch live ABC programming starting Tuesday in New York and Philadelphia. ABC hide caption

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ABC

ABC's Live Streaming Aimed At Keeping Cable Cords Intact

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