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Harssh Poddar, a senior police official, addresses a village meeting at a rural school near Malegaon, in northern Maharashtra state. He warns families to be skeptical of what they read online. Earlier this month, Poddar helped rescue five people from being killed by a mob in his constituency. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

Viral WhatsApp Messages Are Triggering Mob Killings In India

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Paige Vickers for NPR

Birth Control Apps Find A Big Market In 'Contraception Deserts'

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Ryan Johnson for NPR

Smartphone Detox: How To Power Down In A Wired World

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LA Johnson/NPR

Deciding At What Age To Give A Kid A Smartphone

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Taxis park along the footpath in Adelaide, Australia. Alva Noe asks: Do taxi apps make people interact less — or better — with their drivers? sasimoto/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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sasimoto/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Psychologist Jean Twenge says smartphones have brought about dramatic shifts in behavior among the generation of children who grew up with the devices. Image Source/Getty Images hide caption

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Image Source/Getty Images

How Smartphones Are Making Kids Unhappy

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Scientists have developed a smartphone app to measure sperm count at home. Hadi Shafiee/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School hide caption

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Hadi Shafiee/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School