smartphone smartphone

Taxis park along the footpath in Adelaide, Australia. Alva Noe asks: Do taxi apps make people interact less — or better — with their drivers? sasimoto/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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sasimoto/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Psychologist Jean Twenge says smartphones have brought about dramatic shifts in behavior among the generation of children who grew up with the devices. Image Source/Getty Images hide caption

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Image Source/Getty Images

How Smartphones Are Making Kids Unhappy

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Scientists have developed a smartphone app to measure sperm count at home. Hadi Shafiee/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School hide caption

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Hadi Shafiee/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School

The posterior end of the Loa loa worm is visible on the left. The disease-causing worm can now be located with a smartphone/microscope hookup. That's a big help because a drug to treat river blindness can be risky if the patient is carrying the worm. BSIP/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/UIG via Getty Images

Smartphones Can Be Smart Enough To Find A Parasitic Worm

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SwiftKey analyzed more than a billion pieces of emoji data, organized by language and country. The poop emoji was most popular in Canada. Unicode/Apple hide caption

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Unicode/Apple

Canadians Love Poop, Americans Love Pizza: How Emojis Fare Worldwide

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Biometrics are increasingly replacing the password for user identification. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Biometrics May Ditch The Password, But Not The Hackers

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