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Roy Moore, GOP Senate candidate and former Alabama chief justice, speaks during the annual Family Research Council's Values Voter Summit in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 13. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Journalists at The Washington Post work in a newsroom surrounded by screens showing its website and updated reader metrics. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

At 'Washington Post,' Tech Is Increasingly Boosting Financial Performance

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Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats and National Security Agency Director Adm. Mike Rogers testify before the Senate Intelligence Committee earlier this month. Jim Watson /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov (left) and Russian Ambassador to the U.S. Sergey Kislyak met with President Trump last week in the Oval Office. Alexander Shcherbak/TASS/Getty Images hide caption

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Carter Page, a former foreign policy adviser to then-presidential candidate Donald Trump, speaks at a news conference at the RIA Novosti news agency in Moscow in December. Page said he was in Moscow to meet with businessmen and politicians. Pavel Golovkin/AP hide caption

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Pavel Golovkin/AP

Listen: Adam Entous on FBI's FISA Court Warrant To Monitor Page

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Plenty of Trump opponents are begging electors to vote against Trump. But it's hard to see that effort being very successful. Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

Presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump has a love/hate relationship with the press, drawing high levels of publicity while limiting access to media organizations. Jan Kruger/Getty Images hide caption

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Jan Kruger/Getty Images