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Aric Toler is part of Bellingcat, an international Internet research organization that has meticulously investigated conflicts around the world. This week, the online group outed one of two Russian agents believed to have been involved in poisonings in the U.K. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Meet The Internet Researchers Unmasking Russian Assassins

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Verizon crews pump water from an access tunnel in Manhattan in 2012 after flooding from Superstorm Sandy knocked out underground Internet cables. Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images

Home goods seller Wayfair and other e-commerce companies had attempted to challenge a South Dakota law that levies taxes on purchases made through certain online retailers. Jenny Kane/AP hide caption

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Jenny Kane/AP

Supreme Court Ruling Means Some Online Purchases Will Cost More

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Sci-fi writer William Gibson says the best way to imagine new technologies and how they could affect society is not through current expertise but by talking to "either artists or criminals." Ron Bull/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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Ron Bull/Toronto Star via Getty Images

Artists And Criminals: On The Cutting Edge Of Tech

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Jenn Liv for NPR

The Father Of The Internet Sees His Invention Reflected Back Through A 'Black Mirror'

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Apple is being urged to help protect young users of its smartphones and tablets, with two investors citing problems that have been linked with spending too much time on social media and looking at screens. Matthias Balk/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Matthias Balk/AFP/Getty Images

It seems like every kid is online. But UNICEF's director of data, Laurence Chandy, observes: "It's a huge inequity between those who have access and those who do not." Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images

People in the U.S. who want to keep their activity hidden are turning to virtual private networks — but VPNs are often insecure. Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Turning To VPNs For Online Privacy? You Might Be Putting Your Data At Risk

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A man walks past a building on the Google campus in Mountain View, Calif. Google search results about health can be influential, but sometimes they can be unreliable or wrong. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Seeking Online Medical Advice? Google's Top Results Aren't Always On Target

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The Federal Communications Commission is accepting public comment on its proposal to loosen the "net neutrality" rules placed on Internet providers in 2015. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Internet Companies Plan Online Campaign To Keep Net Neutrality Rules

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Harold Cardenas Lema runs the blog La Joven Cuba out of the two-room apartment he shares with his mom and girlfriend. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Kahn/NPR

In Cuba, Growing Numbers Of Bloggers Manage To Operate In A Vulnerable Gray Area

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It's already difficult to create distance from the technology that surrounds us, but as connectivity increases, it might become impossible to do so. Aleksandar Nakic/Getty Images hide caption

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Aleksandar Nakic/Getty Images

Online sales are growing by about 15 percent each year, but states say they're not getting their fair share of taxes from e-commerce. razerbird/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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razerbird/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Massachusetts Tries Something New To Claim Taxes From Online Sales

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Mark Fiore for KQED

Is 'Internet Addiction' Real?

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Walt Mossberg has been reporting on technology since the 1990s. He plans to retire in June. Mike Kepka/Courtesy of Walt Mossberg hide caption

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Mike Kepka/Courtesy of Walt Mossberg

After Decades Covering It, Tech Still Amazes Walt Mossberg

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Google wants to pump 1.5 million gallons of water per day to cool servers at its data center in Berkeley County, S.C. "It's great to have Google in this region," conservationist Emily Cedzo said. "So by no means are we going after Google ... Our concern, primarily, is the source of that water." Bruce Smith/AP hide caption

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Bruce Smith/AP

Google Moves In And Wants To Pump 1.5 Million Gallons Of Water Per Day

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