Internet Internet

T-Mobile CEO John Legere pitches a plan that allows unlimited music streaming without additional data charges. Some net neutrality proponents want the FCC to limit plans like these; the commission says it will review them on a case-by-case basis. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

What Net Neutrality Rules Could Mean For Your Wireless Carrier

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Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler unveiled his plan in a Wired op-ed on Wednesday. The FCC is scheduled to vote on the proposal Feb. 26. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images

Randall Stephenson, chairman and CEO of AT&T, introduces President Obama before the latter's remarks Dec. 3 at the quarterly meeting of the Business Roundtable, a group Stephenson chairs. Stephenson has said that increasing regulation of the broadband industry — as proposed by the president — would have a substantial chilling effect on its investment in infrastructure. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Would FCC Plan Harm Telecom Investment? Even Industry Opinion Is Mixed

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President Obama called on the Federal Communications Commission to implement a strict policy of net neutrality and to oppose content providers in restricting bandwidth to customers. Michael Bocchieri/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Bocchieri/Getty Images

The Battle Over Open-Internet Rules Shifts To Congress

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Provo, Utah, is one of three cities in which Google is rolling out its Google Fiber gigabit Internet and television service. George Frey/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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George Frey/Reuters/Landov

As Cities Push For Their Own Broadband, Cable Firms Say Not So Fast

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President Obama speaks at Cedar Falls Utilities in Cedar Falls, Iowa, on Wednesday. He encouraged the Federal Communications Commission to pre-empt state laws that stifle competition for high-speed Internet service. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

Outrage Over Chinese Takeout Brings To Mind A Maxim

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In the early days, Walter Isaacson says, computers were "big ol' things with vacuum tubes" that took up entire rooms. For example, the electric analog computer named ANACOM (shown here in 1950 at Caltech) weighed 6,000 pounds and filled 13 cabinets. AP hide caption

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AP

How The Cold War And George Orwell Helped Make The Internet What It Is

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