Internet Internet

The anonymous Web surfing system Tor is run by volunteers — and sometimes they get caught between the police and criminal suspects. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

When A Dark Web Volunteer Gets Raided By The Police

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The Federal Communications Commission voted to propose its first Internet privacy rules and to expand a phone subsidy program to cover Internet access. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler has proposed what could become the first privacy regulations for Internet service providers. David Ramos/Getty Images hide caption

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David Ramos/Getty Images

FCC Chair: Proposal Would Let Consumers Determine Value Of Internet Privacy

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Ray Tomlinson celebrates after receiving the 2009 Prince of Asturias Award Laureate for the Technical and Scientific Research from Spain's Prince Felipe. Miguel Riopa/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Miguel Riopa/AFP/Getty Images

Facebook board member Marc Andreessen, a Silicon Valley venture capitalist who uses Twitter prolifically, has apologized for tweets suggesting he supported colonialism. Kimberly White/Getty hide caption

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Kimberly White/Getty

Colonialism Comment Puts Facebook Under Scrutiny

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About one-quarter of lower-income families with school-age children say a mobile device is their only way to access the Internet at home, according to a new study. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

How Limited Internet Access Can Subtract From Kids' Education

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Mobile Internet "hot spot" devices are now the most popular item at the Spring Hill Library in Tennessee. Courtesy of the Spring Hill Library hide caption

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Courtesy of the Spring Hill Library

For Internet To Go, Check The Library

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China's Cyberspace Administration minister Lu Wei (second from right) and other officials attend the opening ceremony of the Light of the Internet Expo on Tuesday as part of the Second World Internet Conference, which starts Wednesday. Lu has said that controlling the Internet is about as easy as "nailing Jell-O to the wall." Xu Yu/Xinhua /Landov hide caption

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Xu Yu/Xinhua /Landov

China's Internet Forum May Provide A Peek At Its Cyber-Ambitions

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The Internet has made it easier for older women to find romance, but it also has made them vulnerable to online scammers. 96 Studio/Getty Images hide caption

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96 Studio/Getty Images

Older Women And The Pitfalls Of Looking For Love By Logging On

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