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Computer cafes in South Korea, such as the Oz PC Bang in the Gangnam district of Seoul, are often shiny places with big, comfy chairs, huge screens and fast Internet. Michael Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Michael Sullivan/NPR

Hooked On The Internet, South Korean Teens Go Into Digital Detox

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Tweet Little Lies: Embracing False Selves In The Internet's 'Trick Mirror'

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Created by Chinese programmers, 996.ICU has become a popular repository of workers' rights campaign materials on the website GitHub. The name is a play on a refrain that long work hours of 9 to 9, six days a week, could send tech workers to the intensive care unit. 996.ICU/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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996.ICU/Screenshot by NPR

GitHub Has Become A Haven For China's Censored Internet Users

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Demonstrators shout during a Free Internet rally in Moscow, Russia, on Sunday. The protesters fear widespread censorship and isolation, following a bill that calls for Russia to be cut off from the global Internet. Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP hide caption

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Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP

A 5G cell (center) in Sacramento, Calif. Mayor Darrell Steinberg says he hopes the new high-speed wireless service will attract businesses to the city. Laura Sydell/NPR hide caption

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Laura Sydell/NPR

Coming To A City Near You, 5G. Fastest Wireless Yet Will Bring New Services

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This is a visualization of global Internet attacks, seen during the 4th China Internet Security Conference in Beijing. Microsoft's Bing search engine is no longer accessible in China, the company reports. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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Ng Han Guan/AP

Berlin is a tech hub, but 70 percent of the city's businesses have complained to the city's Chamber of Commerce and Industry about inadequate broadband. Rafael Dols/Getty Images hide caption

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Rafael Dols/Getty Images

Berlin Is A Tech Hub, So Why Are Germany's Internet Speeds So Slow?

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Cuba's telecom monopoly is rolling out broad Internet access for mobile phone users this week. Here, a woman uses her smartphone to surf the Internet in Havana. Desmond Boylan/AP hide caption

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Desmond Boylan/AP

Starbucks announced on Thursday it will start blocking pornography and illegal content on its free Wi-Fi networks in stores throughout the U.S. Ted S. Warren/Associated Press hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/Associated Press

In dueling lawsuits, Match, which owns Tinder, alleges that Bumble infringed on Tinder's intellectual property — while Bumble says that argument is bogus. Cameron Pollack/NPR hide caption

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Cameron Pollack/NPR

The Tinder-Bumble Feud: Dating Apps Fight Over Who Owns The Swipe

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Aric Toler is part of Bellingcat, an international Internet research organization that has meticulously investigated conflicts around the world. This week, the online group outed one of two Russian agents believed to have been involved in poisonings in the U.K. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Meet The Internet Researchers Unmasking Russian Assassins

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