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U.S. lawmakers will question lobbyists and officials from Facebook, Google, Amazon and Apple on an array of issues. Reuters hide caption

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Reuters

'Facebook Is Dangerous': Firms In Hot Seat As Congress Probes Big Tech

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Apple CEO Tim Cook delivers the keynote address at the 2019 Apple Worldwide Developers Conference in San Jose, Calif., on Monday. The company announced that it's breaking up the iTunes application into three apps handling music, podcasts and TV. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Supreme Court Justices Neil Gorsuch (left) and Brett Kavanaugh wrote opposing opinions in a high-profile case involving Apple's App Store. The two Trump appointees are seen here at the Capitol in February. Doug Mills/Pool / Reuters hide caption

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Doug Mills/Pool / Reuters

Hundreds of health care providers around the United States allow their patients to use Apple's Health app to store their medical records. Apple hide caption

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Apple

Storing Health Records On Your Phone: Can Apple Live Up To Its Privacy Values?

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The Absher app, available in the Apple and Google apps stores in Saudi Arabia, allows men to track the whereabouts of their wives and daughters. Apple App Store/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Apple App Store/Screenshot by NPR

Gizmodo's Kashmir Hill tried to disconnect from all Amazon products, including smart speakers, as part of a bigger experiment in living without the major tech players. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Why We Can't Break Up With Big Tech

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An Apple executive talks about group FaceTime during an announcement of new products at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference in June. Apple says it has disabled group FaceTime after a bug was revealed letting callers eavesdrop on recipients before they accepted a call. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

People walk past an Apple store in Beijing in December 2018. Apple CEO cited weaker-than-expected iPhone sales in China as the company lowered its quarterly revenue estimates Wednesday. Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images

Apple already employs more people in Austin than it does in any other city outside of its California headquarters. The new campus will be near its existing facility in the North Austin area. Apple hide caption

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Apple

Different apples need different controlled storage environments. For example, Honeycrisps are sensitive to low temperatures so you can't put them in cold environments right after they've been harvested. And Fujis can't take high carbon dioxide levels. Getty Images/Westend61 hide caption

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Getty Images/Westend61