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Tim Cook visited the NPR offices in Washington, D.C., in 2015. On Monday, he spoke with NPR about Apple users' privacy and the importance of trade to global relationships. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Apple Requested 'Zero' Personal Data In Deals With Facebook, CEO Tim Cook Says

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A child plays with a mobile phone while riding in a New York subway in December. Two major Apple investors urged the iPhone maker to take action to curb growing smartphone use among children. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

The Nasdaq composite index, which includes many tech stocks, has lost nearly 7 percent since March 12. Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images

Tech Stocks Have Lost Some Of Their Luster, Dragging The Stock Market Lower

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The iOS 11 control center is displayed on the iPhone 8 Plus in New York in September. Apple says its iOS devices are among those affected by the Meltdown vulnerability. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

Apple says that it slows the processors in some of its older phones, such as its iPhone 6s Plus, to match their aging, less powerful batteries. Cole Bennetts/Getty Images hide caption

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Cole Bennetts/Getty Images

Apple Says It Slows Older iPhones To Save Their Battery Life

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The FBI is struggling to access the cellphone of the Texas church shooter, which is reportedly an iPhone, reigniting the debate over encryption. Brandon Chew/NPR hide caption

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Brandon Chew/NPR

Phil Schiller, Apple's senior vice president of worldwide marketing, announces features of the new iPhone X on Sept. 12 at the Steve Jobs Theater on the new Apple campus in Cupertino, Calif. The phone's new ability to unlock itself using a scan of its owner's face inspired a strong, divided reaction. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

iPhone X's Face ID Inspires Privacy Worries — But Convenience May Trump Them

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Apple executive Philip Schiller presents a wireless charging system, displayed with the new iPhone X and Apple Watch alongside cordless headphones called AirPods. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

Brad Smith speaks at the Microsoft Annual Shareholders meeting in 2015. The Microsoft president issued sharp words Tuesday against President Trump's decision to cancel DACA in six months and called on Congress to make immigration a top priority. Stephen Brashear/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Brashear/Getty Images

Microsoft President To Trump: To Deport A DREAMer, You'll Have To Go Through Us

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A spectator at Wimbledon last month uses an iPad to take pictures of the action. Improved sales of the tablets were part of the good news out of Apple's quarterly report. Adrian Dennis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Adrian Dennis/AFP/Getty Images