gender gender

In diverse workplaces and classrooms — such as this one at Connections Education in Baltimore — recent research suggests that adhering to standards of political correctness can actually boost, rather than inhibit, the generation of fresh ideas. Tom Dubanowich/PR Newswire hide caption

toggle caption
Tom Dubanowich/PR Newswire

Josh Kronberg-Rasner was the only openly gay employee at a food service company in Casper, Wyo. He was fired in 2012 shortly after being assigned a new manager. Miles Bryan/Wyoming Public Media hide caption

toggle caption
Miles Bryan/Wyoming Public Media

For People Fired For Being Gay, Old Court Case Becomes A New Tool

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/363049315/363101532" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Colorado Rush, a gay rugby team in Denver, at practice. "I've always thought of myself as ... the rugby player that happens to be gay," says Skyler Meyer. "I never want to be the gay man who happens to play rugby." Luke Runyon/KUNC hide caption

toggle caption
Luke Runyon/KUNC

In Changing America, Gay Masculinity Has 'Many Different Shades'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/339831032/342494309" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A product image shows the new Research Institute playset from Lego, which features women in roles as three scientists. In January, the company was criticized by a girl who said all its female characters were "boring." Lego hide caption

toggle caption
Lego

A rare moment of gender parity in philosophy: Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre at a Paris cafe in May 1970. STF/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
STF/AFP/Getty Images