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Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh walks to meet with senators on Capitol Hill last month. He faces days of questioning from senators beginning Tuesday. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Kavanaugh Confirmation Hearings To Focus On 6 Hot-Button Issues

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President Trump stands beside Republican Troy Balderson, running in Ohio's 12th Congressional District, during a rally Saturday in Ohio. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

President Trump spoke to March for Life participants and pro-life leaders at the White House on January 19. He has been signaling that he won't ask potential Supreme Court nominees about their positions on specific cases, but he doesn't need to — all on his short list are conservative judges. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

President Trump's supporters cheer as he speaks at a rally in Nashville, Tenn., in May. While Democrats are fired up for these midterms, so are his voters. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Democratic members of Congress protest the Trump family separate policy. From left to right: Reps. Joseph Crowley, Luis Gutierrez, Pramila Jayapal, John Lewis and Judy Chu. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

The Supreme Court on Monday punted on the merits of partisan gerrymandering. The decision could make it more difficult for challengers of the practice to bring cases in the future. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Supreme Court Leaves 'Wild West' Of Partisan Gerrymandering In Place — For Now

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In separate remarks to reporters at the White House on Friday, President Trump insisted he wanted to see Congress pass legislation that would end his administration's policy of separating migrant families at the border. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Trump Injects Chaos Into Immigration Debate — Opposing, Then Backing GOP Bill

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President Trump arrives at a campaign rally in Elkhart, Ind., on May 10, where he tried to fire up support for GOP Senate candidate Mike Braun, who is challenging Democratic incumbent Sen. Joe Donnelly in a state Trump won easily in 2016. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Trump Is Sticking To His Playbook To Win The Midterms

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Georgia Democratic nominee for governor Stacey Abrams takes the stage to declare victory Tuesday night. Abrams is the first black woman to win a major-party nomination for governor in U.S. history. Jessica McGowan/Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (left) confers with House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy during a May 16 news conference. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

To Quell Growing Rebellion, House GOP Leaders Promise Action On Immigration In June

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Brian Kemp, Georgia's secretary of state, holds a gun as he talks to a young man in one of his ads for his campaign for governor. It has spurred national outrage. Brian Kemp's campaign for Georgia governor via Twitter/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Brian Kemp's campaign for Georgia governor via Twitter/Screenshot by NPR

After Parkland, Some Republicans Try To Outdo Each Other On Gun Rights In Primaries

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Rapper Kanye West and President-elect Donald Trump met in 2016 at Trump Tower in New York. Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images

What The Kanye Controversy Can Teach Us About Black Voters

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Demonstrators march toward Las Vegas City Hall during the March for Our Lives rally last month in Las Vegas, where 58 people were killed in an October 2017 mass shooting. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images

At an event in West Virginia this month, President Trump was seated between Rep. Evan Jenkins (to his right) and state Attorney General Patrick Morrisey, both of whom are running for the Senate. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Republicans Might Want To Run Away From Trump This Year, But Not In West Virginia

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