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abortion

At an October news conference, the Congressional Pro-Choice Caucus called on President Trump to reverse the administration's moves to limit women's access to birth control. Rep. Diana DeGette, D-Colo., spoke at the lectern during the event on Capitol Hill. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Mehnaz sits inside her home in Abbottabad, northern Pakistan. She has one son and six daughters. She has also had three abortions, fearing she would have more girls. Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

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Diaa Hadid/NPR

Why The Abortion Rate In Pakistan Is One Of The World's Highest

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Dr. Kimberly Remski was told by a potential employer that she couldn't provide abortions during her free time, something she felt called to do. "I realized it was something I really needed to do," she says. Kim Kovacik for NPR hide caption

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Kim Kovacik for NPR

An ethnic Kazakh woman tried to cancel her Chinese citizenship after she married and moved to Kazakhstan. When she crossed back into China last year, the problems began. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

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Nicole Xu for NPR

'They Ordered Me To Get An Abortion': A Chinese Woman's Ordeal In Xinjiang

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Singer Meah Pace (left) has been traveling with the Pagitt's group, performing hymns like "Amazing Grace" at parks and churches. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Finding 'Common Good' Among Evangelicals In The Political Season

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Protesters on both sides of the abortion debate demonstrated in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in July concerning Justice Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation. It is thought that a challenge to Roe v. Wade could have a chance of passing now that he is confirmed. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

The state of Missouri has just one health clinic that provides abortions as of Wednesday, following new state requirements. In this 2017 photo, Planned Parenthood supporters and opponents protest and counterprotest in St. Louis. Jim Salter/AP hide caption

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Jim Salter/AP

Supporters celebrate the result of the May 25 referendum in which voters backed the repeal of Ireland's abortion law. The country's health minister predicts the services will be free when they're offered in 2019. Clodagh Kilcoyne/Reuters hide caption

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Clodagh Kilcoyne/Reuters

Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh walks to meet with senators on Capitol Hill last month. He faces days of questioning from senators beginning Tuesday. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Kavanaugh Confirmation Hearings To Focus On 6 Hot-Button Issues

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"We covered a wide range of issues, and it was very helpful, very productive and very important," Sen. Susan Collins said of her meeting with Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh on Tuesday. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Collins Says Supreme Court Nominee Kavanaugh Called Roe v. Wade 'Settled Law'

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Women protest in Buenos Aires on Thursday in support of decriminalizing abortion as Argentine lawmakers debated the measure, which was defeated in the Senate. Natacha Pisarenko/AP hide caption

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Natacha Pisarenko/AP

For Abortion Activists In Argentina, A Campaign Waged Online Faces A Disconnect

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Abortion-rights supporters demonstrate earlier this month outside the National Congress in Buenos Aires, adding the legalization campaign's distinctive green handkerchiefs to outfits alluding to the dystopian novel The Handmaid's Tale. The book's author, Margaret Atwood, has said she drew inspiration from Argentine history. Eitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images

Abortion-rights supporters in Seattle protest on Tuesday against President Trump and his choice of federal appeals Judge Brett Kavanaugh as his second nominee to the Supreme Court. Activists are preparing for the possibility that Kavanaugh's confirmation could weaken abortion rights. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Abortion Rights Advocates Preparing For Life After Roe v. Wade

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President Trump and Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, who announced his retirement on Wednesday, at the public swearing-in ceremony for Justice Neil Gorsuch at the White House in April 2017. Trump will announce his pick to replace Kennedy on July 9. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP