abortion abortion

President Trump and Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, who announced his retirement on Wednesday, at the public swearing-in ceremony for Justice Neil Gorsuch at the White House in April 2017. Trump will announce his pick to replace Kennedy on July 9. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Abortion-rights proponents protest outside the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday. The retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy set the stage for a battle over abortion rights unlike any in a generation. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

What Justice Kennedy's Retirement Means For Abortion Rights

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Abortion rights activists celebrate Thurdsay outside the Argentine Congress in Buenos Aires, shortly after lawmakers in the country's lower chamber passed a bill legalizing abortion. The bill's chances look uncertain in the upper chamber, but that did little to dampen excitement among its supporters. Eeitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eeitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images

A patient talks with a nurse at a traveling contraception clinic in Madagascar run by the British nonprofit group Marie Stopes International. The organization is one of many that has decided to give up U.S. funding because it deems Trump's ban on providing abortion referrals to be ethically unacceptable. Samantha Reinders for NPR hide caption

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Samantha Reinders for NPR

The Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission's chief commissioner, Les Allamby, speaks to members of the media outside of the Supreme Court in London on Thursday. The court said it could not rule on the commissions' challenge to Northern Ireland's strict abortion laws, but that it would have declared them incompatible with human rights laws otherwise. Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images

Activist group Solidarity with Repeal holds a rally calling for abortion rights outside Belfast City Hall last week in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The rally follows Ireland's vote to repeal a constitutional ban on abortion. Charles McQuillan/Getty Images hide caption

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Charles McQuillan/Getty Images

Ireland Voted To Allow Abortion. But It's Still Strictly Banned In Northern Ireland

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The U.S. Supreme Court rejected an appeal to an Arkansas law that would make it illegal to have a medication-induced abortion. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Supreme Court Leaves In Place Law That Effectively Bans Abortion By Pill — For Now

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Supporters of Friday's referendum to repeal Ireland's abortion ban gathered at Dublin Castle on Saturday. Voters overwhelmingly chose to lift abortion restrictions by changing the country's constitution. Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images

Thousands of abortion-rights opponents demonstrate in Dublin on March 10. NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto via Getty Images

Ireland's Abortion Referendum Is Proving Deeply Divisive

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Under rules outlined in a newly unveiled Trump administration proposal, crisis pregnancy centers and other organizations that do not provide standard contraceptive options, like birth control pills or IUDs, could find it easier to apply for Title X funds. Peter Dazeley/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Dazeley/Getty Images

Under Trump, Family Planning Funds Could Go To Groups That Oppose Contraception

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President Trump speaks during the Susan B. Anthony List's 11th annual Campaign for Life Gala at the National Building Museum on Tuesday. President Trump addressed the annual gala of the anti-abortion group and urged people to vote in the midterm election. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Planned Parenthood's affiliated clinics, like this one in Chicago, provide wellness exams and comprehensive contraceptive services, as well as screenings for cancer and sexually transmitted diseases for both women and men. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

In a statement from the Planned Parenthood Federation of America on the rule, the group said it would not "stand by while our basic health rights are stripped away." Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

Clinics That Refer Women For Abortions Would Not Get Federal Funds Under New Rule

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President Trump shakes hands with Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar after he is sworn in by Vice President Pence on Jan. 29. Major reproductive health organizations are voicing concerns about the Trump administration's new approach to federal family-planning grants, which may reduce the role of Planned Parenthood and place greater emphasis on "natural family planning." Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP