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Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders and Martin O'Malley take the stage after individually answering questions during Friday night's First In The South Democratic Presidential Forum at Winthrop University in Rock Hill, S.C. Chuck Burton/AP hide caption

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Chuck Burton/AP

Jack Bogle wants Americans to make more money in the stock market and give less away to financial firms. Courtesy of Vanguard hide caption

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Courtesy of Vanguard

The George Washington Of Investing Wants You For The Revolution

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More than half of working people in this country have saved less than $25,000 for retirement and many pay crippling investment fees that eat away at gains. Automated financial advisers called roboadvisers offer a low-fee alternative. Annette Elizabeth Allen/NPR hide caption

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Annette Elizabeth Allen/NPR

Would You Let A Robot Manage Your Retirement Savings?

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Pressure To Act Unethically Looms Over Wall Street, Survey Finds

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Known by the nickname "Wall Street," Curtis Carroll teaches financial literacy at the San Quentin Prison, helping inmates prepare for life after incarceration. Carroll, however, is serving a life sentence. Courtesy of The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation hide caption

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Courtesy of The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation

Investment Guru Teaches Financial Literacy While Serving Life Sentence

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A trader stands outside the New York Stock Exchange on Oct. 31, 2012. Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images

Markets May Stumble Or Skyrocket, But This Economist Says Hold On Tight

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A New York Stock Exchange trader works on the floor on Dec. 17. Stocks rose nearly 300 points after the Federal Reserve announced it plans to begin raising interest rates next year. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Economy Weathers A Bad Winter And Other Storms To Finish 2014 Strong

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While traders may still roam the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, there's unseen action taking place every millisecond via fiber optic cables connecting computers run by trading firms and computers run by the Exchange. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Burton/Getty Images