Wall Street Wall Street

The exterior of the New York Stock Exchange on Feb. 10. A lobbying battle is being waged over a rule requiring financial advisers to act in their clients' best interest in retirement planning. Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images

Trump Moving To Delay Rule That Protects Workers From Bad Financial Advice

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Donald Trump has nominated Jay Clayton, a Wall Street lawyer, to head the Securities and Exchange Commission. Critics say it's another example of Trump packing his Cabinet with Wall Street insiders. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Can An SEC Nominee With Ties To Goldman Regulate Wall Street Impartially?

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When Hillary Clinton appeared to be winning the Sept. 26 debate with Donald Trump at Hofstra University, stock futures rose and so did oil prices, a report says. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

In this May 8, 2014, photo, Rep. Scott Garrett attends a hearing about the international financial system in Washington, D.C. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Anti-Gay Remarks Lost A Congressman Wall Street, And Maybe His House Seat

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John Podesta walks off stage after delivering a speech on the first day of the Democratic National Convention July 25 in Philadelphia. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling, shown here at a hearing in March, claims many of the provisions in Dodd-Frank have hurt the economy. Jacquelyn Martin/wld hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/wld

Sen. Bernie Sanders has emphasized shadow banking less than Hillary Clinton, but he maintains that his overall platform is much tougher on Wall Street than hers. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Risky Shadow Banks Become Campaign Fodder For Democrats

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