Navajo Nation Navajo Nation

Tommy Rock received his Ph.D. from Northern Arizona University in the School of Earth Science and Environmental Sustainability. Rock grew up in Monument Valley and worked in the tourism industry before going away to college. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

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Laurel Morales/KJZZ

Navajo President: Go To College, Then Bring That Knowledge Home

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Tribal leaders worry that they will be left out of discussions surrounding major decisions affecting tribes and their land, like that of the Navajo Nation which covers parts of Arizona, Utah and New Mexico. Jeff Overs/BBC News for Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Overs/BBC News for Getty Images

An ancient petroglyph panel is pocked with bullet holes. Some say increased federal protection is needed to prevent further damage and vandalism to areas like this one, which is now included in Bears Ears National Monument. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

With National Monuments Under Review, Bears Ears Is Focus Of Fierce Debate

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At Saint Michael's Association for Special Education in St. Michaels, Ariz., the tap water sometimes runs yellow, brown and black. Sami Rapp/Courtesy of Saint Michael's Association for Special Education hide caption

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Sami Rapp/Courtesy of Saint Michael's Association for Special Education

On The Navajo Nation, Special Ed Students Await Water That Doesn't Stink

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The Navajo Generating Station located on the Navajo Indian Reservation, near Page, Ariz. Amber Brown/Courtesy of Salt River Project hide caption

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Amber Brown/Courtesy of Salt River Project

Navajo Workers At Coal-Fired Power Plant Brace For Its Closing

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Navajo students at Crystal Boarding School in New Mexico sing traditional songs in class. Carrie Jung/KJZZ hide caption

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Carrie Jung/KJZZ

Native American Education: What Will It Take To Fix The 'Epitome Of Broken'?

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Navajo miners work at the Kerr-McGee uranium mine at Cove, Ariz., on May 7, 1953. AP hide caption

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AP

For The Navajo Nation, Uranium Mining's Deadly Legacy Lingers

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Residents who used to have to describe where their house was are now getting official home addresses. Carrie Jung/KJZZ hide caption

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Carrie Jung/KJZZ

Navigating Navajo Nation Soon To Be Easier For Amazon, Ambulances

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After the Animas River spill, rancher Irving Shaggy is forced to travel a 70-mile round trip to get water for his livestock. "It's going to be a long struggle," he says. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

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Laurel Morales/KJZZ

Navajo Nation Farmers Feel The Weight Of Colorado Mine Spill

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Sgt. Barbara Johnson and Corrections Lt. Robbin Preston run the Tuba City Juvenile Detention Center on the Navajo Nation. Laurel Morales/NPR hide caption

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Juvenile Justice System Failing Native Americans, Studies Show

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Darlene Arviso is known as the water lady in Smith Lake, N.M., on the Navajo Nation. She delivers water to 250 people each month. Here, she fills buckets from her water truck. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

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Laurel Morales/KJZZ

For Many Navajo, A Visit From The 'Water Lady' Is A Refreshing Sight

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