Obama Obama

Former President Barack Obama will report for jury duty in Cook County, Ill., in November. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Former Presidents: They're Just Like Us! Obama Summoned For Jury Duty

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Computer Scientists Demonstrate The Potential For Faking Video

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The Agriculture Department established research centers in 2014 to translate climate science into real-world ideas to help farmers and ranchers adapt to a hotter climate. But a tone of skepticism about climate change from the Trump administration has some farmers worried that this research they rely on may now be in jeopardy. Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

Puerto Rican nationalist Oscar López Rivera gestures as he is released Wednesday from house arrest in San Juan, Puerto Rico, after 36 years in custody. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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Carlos Giusti/AP

President Kennedy addresses a joint session of Congress on Jan. 30, 1961. STF/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STF/AFP/Getty Images

Past Presidents Made History In First Address To Congress

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In the first of three conversations about President Barack Obama's racial legacy, Code Switch asks how much was race or racism drove the way the first black president was treated and how he governed. Richie Pope for NPR hide caption

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Richie Pope for NPR

Obama's Legacy: Diss-ent or Diss-respect?

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We continue conversations on President Barack Obama's racial legacy--this time, we hear opinions on where he fell short or failed people of color. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

Obama's Legacy: Callouts and Fallouts

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It's likely that Barack Obama will be known not only as the first black president, but also as the first president of everybody's race. Many Americans and people beyond the U.S. borders have projected their multicultural selves onto the president. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

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In a small room in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, mail from children is read, sorted into categories and answered by staff — except for the few that are sent every week to President Obama. The letters are eventually stored at the National Archives and will later find a home in the president's library. Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Becky Harlan/NPR

Barack Obama, graduate of Harvard Law School '91, is shown here on campus after he was named head of the Harvard Law Review in 1990. Joe Wrinn/Harvard University/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Wrinn/Harvard University/Corbis via Getty Images

LISTEN: Before Obama Was President, In His Own Words On NPR

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Volunteers in Des Moines make calls at the campaign headquarters of then-Democratic presidential hopeful Sen. Barack Obama on Dec. 5, 2007 ahead of the Iowa caucus. Obama has called those "fired-up" campaign workers from his 2008 campaign, one of his proudest legacies. Rick Gershon/Getty Images hide caption

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Rick Gershon/Getty Images

Obama's Legacy: His Army Of Campaign Volunteers Continues To Serve

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Planned Parenthood's president, Cecile Richards, addresses the Democratic National Convention in July. Republicans in Congress have repeatedly threatened to cut off federal funding for Planned Parenthood because the family planning group performs abortions at some clinics. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP