Iraq Iraq

Masoud Barzani stepped down last week as president of Iraq's Kurdistan regional government. The independence referendum he pushed through resulted in a military attack by Iraqi forces. But, he tells NPR, "I am very proud that we have given the opportunity for the Kurdish people to express their vote." He says the region will reassess its relationship with the U.S. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

After Iraqi Kurdish Independence Vote Backfires, 'I Do Not Regret It,' Says Barzani

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In Iraq, masgouf is part of the national cuisine, but it's getting harder to find as the country still reels from war, sanctions, water quality and economic problems. Sabah Arar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sabah Arar/AFP/Getty Images

Mustafa Ahmed walks near home on the outskirts of Fallujah. As a baby, he was severely injured during the battle to liberate Fallujah from al-Qaida. His leg was amputated and he later received medical treatment in Portland, Oregon. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

Iraqi security forces advancing Thursday towards the town of Faysh Khabur, which is located on the Turkish and Syrian borders in the Iraqi Kurdish autonomous region. Ahmad al-Rubaye /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmad al-Rubaye /AFP/Getty Images

Iraqi forces use heavy equipment to damage a poster of Iraqi Kurdish President Massoud Barzani on the southern outskirts of Kirkuk, as Baghdad seeks to take control of the city from the Kurds. Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images

A teacher greets students on the first day of elementary school in Mosul, where regular classes have started for the first time since ISIS took over the northern Iraqi city three years ago. Hundreds of schools were damaged or destroyed in the fighting to take back Mosul. Others that have reopened lack books and basic supplies. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

After 3 Years Under ISIS, Mosul's Children Go Back To School

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Jalal Talabani, shown here in 2003 in Istanbul, died Tuesday in Germany at age 83. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

As Kurdish Leader And Iraqi President, Jalal Talabani Brought People Together

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Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, purportedly seen here in video posted in 2014, had not been heard publicly for nearly a year — until Thursday, when ISIS released a possible audio recording of Baghdadi. AP hide caption

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AP

Kurds wave Israeli flags at a Kurdish independence rally. Israel is the only country in the region to support the referendum. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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What To Know About The Independence Referendum In Iraqi Kurdistan

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A camp where more than 1,300 women and children, all foreign nationals and believed to be relatives of Islamic State militants, were kept on the outskirts of Mosul. They have been moved by Iraqi officials, to the concern of aid agencies. Balint Szlanko/AP hide caption

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Balint Szlanko/AP

Bashar Abdul Jabar lost his 15-year-old son, Ahmed, when part of their house collapsed during fighting between Iraqi troops and ISIS. He returned to the city to retrieve his boy's body with the help of civil defense forces. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR