Iraq Iraq

Saeed Ahmed Khalaf, left, and his family live in a tent on Mount Sinjar. He believes the U.S. would either help protect the Yazidis in Sinjar or help the group emigrate to a safe place. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Yazidis Remain In Fear On Iraq's Mount Sinjar After Attempted Genocide

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More than eight months after the battle ended the government hasn't restored electricity or running water in Mosul's Old City. Hundreds of residents with nowhere else to go have come back to try to live in their damaged houses. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Months After ISIS, Much Of Iraq's Mosul Is Still Rubble

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For refugees in Austria who choose to voluntarily go back to their countries of origin, a one-way trip to the Vienna International Airport marks the end of their journey in Europe. Hans Punz/AP hide caption

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A New Approach To Refugees: Pay Them To Go Home

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Sisters Raffal, left, and Farah Khaled are first-year students at Mosul University in Iraq. They're standing outside the university library, which was burned down, along with most of its books, by ISIS when it controlled the city. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Life After ISIS: One Sister Wants To Rebuild. The Other Can't Wait To Leave

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This particular Mosul orphanage holds 18 children under the age of 6, some of them the abandoned children of Yazidi women kidnapped by Islamic State fighters. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Kidnapped, Abandoned Children Turn Up At Mosul Orphanage As ISIS Battle Ends

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Civil defense workers carrying the body of a civilian retrieved from the rubble of a house destroyed in airstrike. They've collected almost 1,500 bodies so far in west Mosul – many of them women and children – and are still finding casualties. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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More Civilians Than ISIS Fighters Are Believed Killed In Mosul Battle

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Thousands of Iraqi soldiers in Baghdad take part in a training exercise in 2015. On Saturday, the Iraqi prime minister announced its war on the Islamic State group was over, after more than three years of fighting. ALI AL-SAADI/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Army Lt. Gen. Paul Funk (left), and Iraqi Maj. Gen. Najm Abdullah al-Jibouri, walk through a busy market in Mosul, Iraq, on Oct. 4. U.S. forces in Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan have been increasing this year under President Trump, going from about 18,000 at the beginning of the year to 26,000 recently, according to Pentagon figures. Spc. Avery Howard/AP hide caption

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Spc. Avery Howard/AP

Kawkab walks with a social worker in the Dabaga camp for displaced Iraqis. Kawkab says she was seven or eight when she saw ISIS militants shoot her mother dead. "They shot her with an assault rifle," she says. "They shot her and she died and they threw her off the bridge. I asked them, 'Why did you kill her? She's my mother. She didn't do anything.'" Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Traumatized And Vulnerable To Abuse, Orphans From Mosul Are 'Living In Another World'

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Masoud Barzani stepped down last week as president of Iraq's Kurdistan regional government. The independence referendum he pushed through resulted in a military attack by Iraqi forces. But, he tells NPR, "I am very proud that we have given the opportunity for the Kurdish people to express their vote." He says the region will reassess its relationship with the U.S. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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After Iraqi Kurdish Independence Vote Backfires, 'I Do Not Regret It,' Says Barzani

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In Iraq, masgouf is part of the national cuisine, but it's getting harder to find as the country still reels from war, sanctions, water quality and economic problems. Sabah Arar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mustafa Ahmed walks near home on the outskirts of Fallujah. As a baby, he was severely injured during the battle to liberate Fallujah from al-Qaida. His leg was amputated and he later received medical treatment in Portland, Oregon. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Iraqi security forces advancing Thursday towards the town of Faysh Khabur, which is located on the Turkish and Syrian borders in the Iraqi Kurdish autonomous region. Ahmad al-Rubaye /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Iraqi forces use heavy equipment to damage a poster of Iraqi Kurdish President Massoud Barzani on the southern outskirts of Kirkuk, as Baghdad seeks to take control of the city from the Kurds. Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A teacher greets students on the first day of elementary school in Mosul, where regular classes have started for the first time since ISIS took over the northern Iraqi city three years ago. Hundreds of schools were damaged or destroyed in the fighting to take back Mosul. Others that have reopened lack books and basic supplies. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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After 3 Years Under ISIS, Mosul's Children Go Back To School

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