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France Won't Take ISIS Fighters Back, But Doesn't Want Them Executed Either

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Women carry children near the al-Hol camp in Syria's Kurdish-majority region of Rojava. The camp is filled with more than 72,000 people — most of them women and children who came out of the last ISIS-held territory. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

'We Pray For The Caliphate To Return': ISIS Families Crowd Into Syrian Camps

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Search and rescue operations near the Iraqi city of Mosul were underway after a boat sank in the Tigris River on Thursday. Authorities say dozens of people, including many children, are confirmed dead. Abdullah Rashid/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Abdullah Rashid/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Mazen (right), 13, and his brother Mezban in a camp for displaced Yazidis in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. Mazen was freed recently, five years after being kidnapped by ISIS. He was found in Baghouz, the last ISIS stronghold in Syria. His brother was also kidnapped and, 2-1/2 years ago, was rescued with their mother. The boys' father is still missing. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

Freed From ISIS, Few Yazidis Return To Suffering Families, Many Remain Missing

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Mickey Willenbring tends to one of her Navajo-Churro sheep at Dot Ranch in Scio, Ore. Tim Herrera hide caption

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Tim Herrera

After Combat, A Veteran Finds Solace In Sheep Farming

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In this file photo, U.S. Rep. Walter Jones, R-N.C., stands in front of photos of fallen soldiers along a hallway leading to his office on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. Jones, a once-fervent supporter of the 2003 invasion of Iraq who later became an equally outspoken Republican critic of the war, died Sunday. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Mourners transport the flag-draped coffin of Iraqi archaeologist Lamia al-Gailani, seen in the poster, for burial during her funeral procession in the National Museum in Baghdad on Jan. 21. Iraq is mourning the loss of a beloved archaeologist who helped rebuild her country's leading museum in the aftermath of the U.S. invasion in 2003. Khalid Mohammed/AP hide caption

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Khalid Mohammed/AP

U.S. Marine Brig. Gen. Austin Renforth (center) went with his Iraqi counterpart, Lt. Gen. Jalil Jabbar al-Rubaie (center left), for a tour of Baghdad's most crowded neighborhoods on Friday. Mootaz Sami/AP Images for NPR hide caption

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Mootaz Sami/AP Images for NPR

A U.S. Commander Went For A Rare Stroll In Baghdad. Many Iraqis Just Shrugged

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This 2018 photo provided by Andrea Gallagher shows her husband, Navy SEAL Edward Gallagher. Gallagher is facing charges of premeditated murder and other offenses in connection with the fatal stabbing of a teenage Islamic State prisoner under his care in Iraq in 2017 and the shooting of unarmed Iraqi civilians. His attorney says he will plead not guilty to all the charges at a naval hearing Friday. Andrea Gallagher/AP hide caption

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Andrea Gallagher/AP

Following The Defeat Of ISIS, Iraq Pursues A Campaign Of Revenge

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Abdullatif Al-Humaym, the head of Sunni Muslim endowments in all of Iraq, places the cornerstone for the rebuilding of the Great Mosque of Al-Nuri in Mosul. The historic mosque and its leaning minaret were destroyed in 2017 when Iraqi forces reclaimed the city from the Islamic State. Zaid al-Obeidi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Zaid al-Obeidi/AFP/Getty Images

Naser al-Shimary, deported this year to Iraq from the U.S., greets his four-year-old son Vincent at Baghdad international airport. Shimary had lived in the U.S. since he was five years old. He agreed to be deported under a practice halted by a U.S. court this summer. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

'They Know I'm Different': Deportee Struggles In Iraq After Decades Living In U.S.

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American conservationist Jeff Allen (center) directs Iraqi technicians laying mortar between ancient bricks at the site of Babylon. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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In Iraq, A Race To Protect The Crumbling Bricks Of Ancient Babylon

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In Mosul, reminders of the Islamic State's brutal rule include a school wall covered with drawings showing how militants executed their prisoners. The U.N. says the area around the city holds mass graves where thousands of people were buried. Ari Jalal/Reuters hide caption

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Ari Jalal/Reuters

Assyrian artifacts are displayed at Iraq's National Museum in Baghdad in 2016. The $30 million sale of a 3,000-year-old Assyrian relief is sparking concern that similar artifacts will be looted. Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images

An Iraqi protester stands flashing the victory gesture outside the burning headquarters of the Iranian Consulate in Basra on Sept. 7. Haidar Mohammed Ali /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Haidar Mohammed Ali /AFP/Getty Images

An Iraqi protester waves a national flag while demonstrating outside the burnt-down local government headquarters in the southern city of Basra on Sept. 7, during demonstrations over problems including poor public services. Haidar Mohammed Ali/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Haidar Mohammed Ali/AFP/Getty Images

Months Of Protests Roil Iraq's Oil Capital Basra

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An Iraqi demonstrator poses outside the torched Iranian consulate on Friday, as protests over poor public services broke out in the city of Basra. Haidar Mohammed Ali/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Haidar Mohammed Ali/AFP/Getty Images