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An Iranian national shops at a popular market in the holy Iraqi Shiite city of Najaf. Recently, the city — where millions of international pilgrims visit every year — has been spared the worst of Iraq's violence. Haidar Hamdani /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Haidar Hamdani /AFP/Getty Images

With Shopping, Holy Sites, Najaf Offers Respite From Iraq's Violence

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An Iraqi child, whose family fled from Islamic State violence in the northern city of Mosul, stands outside a tent that serves as a school in the southern city of Najaf on Sunday. Some 2 million Iraqis have been driven from their homes by fighting this year. Alaa Al-Marjani /Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Alaa Al-Marjani /Reuters/Landov

Amid Violence, Iraq Fractures Again Along Religious Lines

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Sunni tribesmen train on the outskirts of Ramadi, Iraq, on Nov. 16. Legislation authorizing a force of Sunni fighters drawn from Anbar province itself — modeled on the U.S. National Guard — has yet to be passed. Ali al-Mashhadani/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Ali al-Mashhadani/Reuters/Landov

Despite A Massacre By ISIS, An Iraqi Tribe Vows To Fight Back

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Islamic State fighters march in Raqqa, Syria. The group has killed five Western hostages in recent months. In the 1990s, many radical Islamist groups gave interviews to journalists and refrained from kidnapping Westerners. AP hide caption

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AP

Construction workers in Irbil, in the Kurdish north of Iraq, work on Kurdish business tycoon Shihab Shihab's version of the White House. Leila Fadel/NPR hide caption

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Leila Fadel/NPR

Near The Front Lines In Iraq, An Homage To The White House

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Iraqi Kurdish soldiers, or peshmerga, patrol an area in the recently recaptured town of Zumar, near Mosul in northern Iraq on Oct. 29. When the Islamic State captured the town in August, the Kurds fled. Now that the Kurds are in control, the Arabs are all gone. STR/EPA /LANDOV hide caption

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STR/EPA /LANDOV

In A Back-And-Forth Battle, An Iraqi Town Splits On Ethnic Lines

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Demonstrators chant in favor of the Islamic State and carry the group's flags in Mosul, Iraq, in June. With videos, Internet magazines and social media, the group has effectively recruited throughout the world. AP hide caption

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AP
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

A 3-Star General Explains 'Why We Lost' In Iraq, Afghanistan

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An Iraqi Kurdish Peshmerga fighter hold his position in the mountains east of Mosul. Jim Lopez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Lopez/AFP/Getty Images

Ill-Equipped And Underpaid, Kurdish Fighters Hold ISIS At Bay

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President Obama speaks to the media before meeting with his Cabinet in the White House Friday. The president is ordering up to 1,500 additional military personnel to Iraq, to help Iraqi and Kurdish forces fight the extremist group ISIS. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Ret. Army Sgt. 1st Class Max Voelz, 40, with Sgt. Mary Dague, 30, who helped him cope after his wife was killed disarming an IED in Iraq. They only met face-to-face recently, for their StoryCorps conversation. StoryCorps hide caption

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StoryCorps

Bomb Techs Work Through 'Dark Spots' To Brighter Lives

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Iraqi Yazidi women who fled the violence in the northern Iraq take shelter in the city of Dohuk on Aug. 5. The Yazidis, are a small community that follows an ancient faith and have been repeatedly targeted by jihadists. Yazidi leaders say several thousands members of the community have gone missing in recent months. Safin Hamed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Safin Hamed/AFP/Getty Images

Iraq's Yazidis Appeal For Help In Finding Their Missing Women

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Four Americans injured in Iraq and Afghanistan visit Kabul as part of Operation Proper Exit, a program designed for wounded warriors. From left, they are Staff Sgt. Ben Dellinger, Capt. Casey Wolfe, Capt. John Urquhart (who is hidden) and Sgt. James "Eddie" Wright. Sean Carberry/NPR hide caption

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Sean Carberry/NPR

Wounded In Combat, U.S. Troops Go Back For A 'Proper Exit'

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