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Iraqi children follow instructions given by a teacher (center) during an outdoor class at the Hassan Sham camp on Nov. 10. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Felipe Dana/AP

ISIS Drove Them From School. Now The Kids Of Mosul Want To Go Back

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Archaeologist Layla Salih looks around the ancient site of Nimrud, in northern Iraq, outside Mosul. The Islamic State captured the area in 2014 and destroyed many of its archaeological treasures that date back 3,000 years. The extremist group was recently driven out of Nimrud, allowing Salih and others to come back and survey the extensive damage. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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Alice Fordham/NPR

In Northern Iraq, ISIS Leaves Behind An Archaeological Treasure In Ruins

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Shiite worshippers gather for Arbaeen in Karbala on Nov. 20. Dozens of Shiite pilgrims were targeted for attack Thursday after the holiday, which marks the end of the 40-day mourning period after the anniversary of the 7th century martyrdom of Imam Hussein, the Prophet Muhammad's grandson. Karim Kadim/AP hide caption

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Karim Kadim/AP

Iraqi soldiers pose on a tank they captured from ISIS in a small base a few miles east of Mosul. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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Alice Fordham/NPR

The Fight For Mosul, Underway For A Month, Is Only Just Beginning

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President-elect Donald Trump speaks at the Veterans of Foreign Wars convention in Charlotte, N.C., on July 26. Trump has no military experience, but will become commander in chief at a time when the U.S. is bombing targets in four separate wars. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Khalid Yaako Touma, a school teacher and deacon in the village of Karamlesh, collects religious books from one of the churches in the village that ISIS destroyed. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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Alice Fordham/NPR

ISIS Is Gone, But Iraqi Christians Are Wary Of Returning Home

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Iraqis living east of Mosul hold a white flag as they flee Wednesday during an Iraqi army's operation to retake the ISIS-held city. So far, the number of civilians fleeing the fighting has been relatively small. But aid groups warn the numbers could rise dramatically as the fighting moves into the city itself. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

As Iraqi Forces Push Into Mosul, Camps Brace For An Influx Of The Displaced

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Iraq's elite counterterrorism forces advance toward Islamic State positions Tuesday in the village of Tob Zawa, about 5 miles from Mosul, Iraq. Khalid Mohammed/AP hide caption

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Khalid Mohammed/AP

A boy carries mattresses at a camp for displaced families in Debaga, about 50 miles southeast of Mosul, Iraq, on Monday. Camp residents who recently fled areas controlled by the Islamic State say they expect the extremist group to put up a tough fight in Mosul and surrounding areas. Marko Drobnjakovic/AP hide caption

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Marko Drobnjakovic/AP

Near Mosul, Some Residents Flee ISIS, Others Stay And Fight With ISIS

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Iraqi forces raise a flag after retaking Bartella, a town nine miles outside Mosul, Iraq, on Friday. Iraq's army, backed by U.S. air power, began an offensive this week to retake Mosul, the last city in Iraq controlled by the Islamic State. Some smaller towns and villages were retaken this week, but the Iraqis have not yet reached Mosul. Khalid Mohammed/AP hide caption

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Khalid Mohammed/AP

Iraqi pro-government forces hold a position on the frontline on Friday near the village of Tall al-Tibah, some 20 miles south of Mosul, during an operation to retake the hub city from the Islamic State group jihadists. Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty Images

Iraqi Forces Shaken By ISIS Resistance In Fight For Mosul

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Police Gen. Abdulkareem al-Jubouri (center) meets with other police officers outside of Mosul. The police are eager to reclaim their home city from the Islamic State, but some police officers speak openly of seeking revenge. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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When Mosul's Cops Return, Will They Seek Reconciliation Or Revenge?

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As the operation to retake Mosul continues, Iraqis fleeing ISIS-controlled areas of the city arrived Tuesday at the nearby town of al-Qayyarah, secured by the Iraqi army. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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After ISIS, People From Mosul Fear What May Come Next

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