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Iraq

NPR's Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep interviews President Obama on Dec. 17 in the Oval Office, where they discussed U.S. involvement in the Middle East and the world as a whole. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Waiting For A Break: Obama On 'Strategic Patience' In Foreign Policy

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U.S. soldiers patrol the Taji base complex, which hosts Iraqi and U.S. troops north of the capital Baghdad. Taji is one of an eventual five sites where the U.S. and allied countries aim to train 5,000 Iraqi military personnel every six to eight weeks for combat against the so-called Islamic State. Ali al-Saadi /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ali al-Saadi /AFP/Getty Images

There And Back Again For U.S. Military In Iraq

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An Iraqi Christian prays inside a shrine on the grounds of the Mazar Mar Eillia Catholic Church in Irbil, in northern Iraq. Irbil has become home to hundreds of Iraqi Christians who fled their homes as the Islamic State advanced earlier this year. Matt Cardy/Getty Images hide caption

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Matt Cardy/Getty Images

With Each New Upheaval In Iraq, More Minorities Flee

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The city of Pittsburgh is hoping that drawing more skilled immigrants will give it an entrepreneurial boost. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

Pittsburgh Tries To Attract Enterprising Immigrants And Refugees

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Iraqi Kurdish peshmerga fighters arrive Saturday in Sinjar in northern Iraq, where they have made gains against the Islamic State. The Kurds were talking about independence this summer, but now appear focused on fighting the Islamic State. Safin Hamed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Safin Hamed/AFP/Getty Images

Iraqi Kurdish regional President Massoud Barzani speaks with the media at Mount Sinjar, in the town of Sinjar, on Sunday. Barzani was visiting an area that was recently retaken from ISIS militants. STRINGER/IRAQ/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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STRINGER/IRAQ/Reuters/Landov

More than 4,000 officers of the Nineveh province security force are based in an isolated training camp in northern Iraq. Their aim is retaking ISIS-controlled Mosul, Iraq's second-largest city. Deborah Amos/NPR hide caption

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Deborah Amos/NPR

At An Isolated Camp, Iraqi Police Prep For A Showdown With ISIS

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The Iraqi town of Halabja is dominated by Kurds, the group that has been fighting the Islamic State in northern Iraq. However, some Kurdish residents have been slipping away to join the Islamic State. Yahya Ahmad/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Yahya Ahmad/Reuters/Landov

Kurdish Officials Worry About Kurds Joining The Islamic State

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Many Yazidis, like the ones shown here, managed to flee the onslaught of the so-called Islamic State and made their way to relative safety, like this camp near the northern Iraqi border crossing of Zakho. However, some 5,000 Yazidis, many of them women, are still being held hostage by the Islamic State. EPA/Landov hide caption

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EPA/Landov

For Yazidi Women, Escaping ISIS Doesn't Mean The Ordeal Is Over

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Iraqi Finance Minister Hoshyar Zebari announced Tuesday that the Iraqi government and the Kurdistan region have started implementing a deal under which Baghdad resumes funding Kurdish civil servant salaries in return for a share of Kurdish oil exports. Ali Abbas/EPA /LANDOV hide caption

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Ali Abbas/EPA /LANDOV

An Iranian national shops at a popular market in the holy Iraqi Shiite city of Najaf. Recently, the city — where millions of international pilgrims visit every year — has been spared the worst of Iraq's violence. Haidar Hamdani /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Haidar Hamdani /AFP/Getty Images

With Shopping, Holy Sites, Najaf Offers Respite From Iraq's Violence

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An Iraqi child, whose family fled from Islamic State violence in the northern city of Mosul, stands outside a tent that serves as a school in the southern city of Najaf on Sunday. Some 2 million Iraqis have been driven from their homes by fighting this year. Alaa Al-Marjani /Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Alaa Al-Marjani /Reuters/Landov

Amid Violence, Iraq Fractures Again Along Religious Lines

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