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A member of Iraq's elite counterterrorism service flashes the "V" for victory sign Tuesday in Ramadi, the capital of Iraq's Anbar province. Iraq's prime minister says the extremist group will be pushed out of Iraq in 2016. Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images

After Ramadi, A Look At What's Next In The Fight Against ISIS

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Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi (center) attends a funeral for two generals killed in fighting with Islamic State militants in Ramadi, west of Baghdad, in August. In an interview Monday with NPR, the Iraqi leader called on the U.S. to provide more airstrikes but said his country does not want ground forces from the U.S. or any other country. AP hide caption

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AP

Iraqi Leader: We Want More U.S. Airstrikes, But Not U.S. Ground Troops

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In 2014 photo, demonstrators chant pro-ISIS slogans in front of the provincial government headquarters in Mosul, Iraq. AP hide caption

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AP

Fact Check: Did Obama Withdraw From Iraq Too Soon, Allowing ISIS To Grow?

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Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., speaks with a reporter Tuesday before the House voted to tighten the program under which some foreign travelers enter the U.S. without visas. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

The Pentagon says the new force will help secure the border between Iraq and Syria and hunt down Islamic State leaders in raids. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. To Send 100 More Troops To Iraq In Fight Against Islamic State

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After their villages were overrun by ISIS last year, hundreds of Yazidis sought safety on Mount Sinjar, a place they consider miraculous. Many families, including this one, refuse to leave the mountain. Alison Meuse/NPR hide caption

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Alison Meuse/NPR

Targeted By ISIS, These Yazidis Refused To Leave Their Beloved Mountain

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Sinjar city, newly freed from ISIS control by U.S.-backed Kurdish forces, lies in ruins. Alison Meuse/NPR hide caption

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Alison Meuse/NPR

An Iraqi Town Is Retaken From ISIS, And Looting And Retribution Begin

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Kurdish peshmerga forces enter the northern Iraqi town of Sinjar on Friday after pushing out the Islamic State. The town is home to the Yazidi minority; many displaced members of the group say they are wary of returning home. They fear they could still be targeted by neighboring communities that supported the Islamic State. Safin Hamed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Safin Hamed/AFP/Getty Images

ISIS May Be Gone, But Yazidis Fearful Of Returning To Their Iraqi Town

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David Carlson served two tours in Iraq while in the military. Courtesy of David Carlson hide caption

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Courtesy of David Carlson

Behind Bars, Vets With PTSD Face A New War Zone, With Little Support

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Ahmed Chalabi in 2010. Karim Kadim/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Karim Kadim/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Iraqi Politician Ahmed Chalabi Dead Of A Heart Attack, State TV Reports

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