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Iraq

In this photo provided by the Iraqi government, Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi (right) and Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr hold a press conference in Baghdad on May 20. Sadr's coalition won the largest number of seats in Iraq's parliamentary elections. AP hide caption

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AP

Qusay Hussein, 29, survived a suicide bombing in Iraq in 2006. He lost his vision, nose and cheek before moving to the United States. He graduated from a community college in Texas on Thursday and aspires to be a psychologist. Courtesy of Qusay Hussein hide caption

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Courtesy of Qusay Hussein

The Shorja market in central Baghdad, bustling in early April, was targeted in attacks in 2007. Sabah Arar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sabah Arar/AFP/Getty Images

15 Years After U.S. Invasion, Some Iraqis Are Nostalgic For Saddam Hussein Era

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Mosul's Great Mosque of al-Nuri was destroyed in June 2017 by ISIS as government forces closed in on the city. The United Arab Emirates will contribute $50.4 million to restore the mosque and other cultural landmarks. AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty Images

Like other spring holidays, Sere Sal, the Yazidi new year, is about fertility and new life. An ancient Kurdish religious minority, the Yazidis color eggs for the holiday in honor of the colors that Tawus Melek, God's chief angel, is said to have spread throughout the new world. Nawaf Ashur hide caption

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Nawaf Ashur

Iraqi Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr addresses his supporters during a demonstration in Baghdad in 2017. He is now aligning himself with Communists ahead of Iraq's May election. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Saeed Ahmed Khalaf, left, and his family live in a tent on Mount Sinjar. He believes the U.S. would either help protect the Yazidis in Sinjar or help the group emigrate to a safe place. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

Yazidis Remain In Fear On Iraq's Mount Sinjar After Attempted Genocide

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More than eight months after the battle ended the government hasn't restored electricity or running water in Mosul's Old City. Hundreds of residents with nowhere else to go have come back to try to live in their damaged houses. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

Months After ISIS, Much Of Iraq's Mosul Is Still Rubble

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For refugees in Austria who choose to voluntarily go back to their countries of origin, a one-way trip to the Vienna International Airport marks the end of their journey in Europe. Hans Punz/AP hide caption

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Hans Punz/AP

A New Approach To Refugees: Pay Them To Go Home

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Sisters Raffal, left, and Farah Khaled are first-year students at Mosul University in Iraq. They're standing outside the university library, which was burned down, along with most of its books, by ISIS when it controlled the city. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

Life After ISIS: One Sister Wants To Rebuild. The Other Can't Wait To Leave

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This particular Mosul orphanage holds 18 children under the age of 6, some of them the abandoned children of Yazidi women kidnapped by Islamic State fighters. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

Kidnapped, Abandoned Children Turn Up At Mosul Orphanage As ISIS Battle Ends

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