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The Rev. Charles Perry of Unity Church, in Birmingham, Ala., marries Curtis Stephens, center, and his partner of 30 years, Pat Helms, Monday at the Jefferson County Courthouse. Alabama began issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples Monday after the U.S. Supreme Court refused to block the marriages in the state. Hal Yeager/AP hide caption

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Hal Yeager/AP

Supreme Court Won't Stop Gay Marriages In Alabama

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Jayne Rowse (left) speaks as April DeBoer kisses her during a news conference in Ferndale, Mich., on March 21, 2014. An appellate court upheld Michigan's — and three other states' — bans on gay marriage. The Supreme Court said Friday it will review the appellate court's decision. DeBoer and Rowse are the Michigan couple in the case. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

As Gay Marriages Rise, Now Comes The Case For Same-Sex Divorce

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Kansas can't deny same-sex couples' requests for a marriage license, a federal judge ruled Tuesday. Kerry Wilks (right), one of four women represented by the American Civil Liberties Union in a lawsuit against the ban, spoke with reporters after a hearing Friday. John Hanna/AP hide caption

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John Hanna/AP

People hold signs, including some reading "America is ready for marriage," at a same-sex marriage victory celebration on Oct. 6 in Salt Lake City, Utah. America may be ready, but Republicans aren't: Rising popular support for same-sex marriage is posing a problem for the GOP. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/Getty Images

Turf Shifts In Culture Wars As Support For Gay Marriage Rises

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Lynda Johnson (center) cries as she watches her daughter Kandyce Johnson (left) marry Jana Downs in Charlotte, N.C., on Monday. Same-sex couples lined up to get marriage licenses Monday, the first day Mecklenburg County issued the licenses. Jeff Siner/MCT/Landov hide caption

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Jeff Siner/MCT/Landov