Muslim Muslim

Noorbakhsh (left) and Ahmed are both contributors to the book Love, Inshallah: The Secret Lives of Muslim Women. Sabiha Basrai hide caption

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Sabiha Basrai

What Is A 'Good Muslim' Anyway? A Podcast Disrupts The Narrative

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Three women, two of them partially veiled, walk past a hijabs shop in Paris. The wearing of the veil has been a serious point of contention in France, with the government banning its use in public schools and the wearing of face-covering garments, including burqas and niqabs, in public. Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images

Many French Muslims Find Lives Of Integration, Not Separation

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Members of the Muslim community leave the East London Mosque after prayers before the start of the holy month of Ramadan in June 2014. The mosque has an estimated 7,000 worshippers. Rob Stothard/Getty Images hide caption

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Rob Stothard/Getty Images

Britain's Muslims Still Feel The Need To Explain Themselves

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This image provided by the Durham County Sheriff's Office shows a booking photo of Craig Stephen Hicks, 46, who was arrested on three counts of murder early Wednesday. On his Facebook page, Hicks described himself as a gun-toting atheist. Durham County Sheriff's Office/AP hide caption

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Durham County Sheriff's Office/AP

Some See Extreme 'Anti-Theism' As Motive In N.C. Killings

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Dean Obeidallah and Negin Farsad, co-directors of The Muslims Are Coming! Shereen Marisol Meraji/Code Switch hide caption

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Shereen Marisol Meraji/Code Switch

Muslim Comics Tour America To Fight Stereotypes With Laughs

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A butcher shop in Paris, which prominently advertises that it sells halal meat. Michel Euler/AP hide caption

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Michel Euler/AP