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The Washington Post set records for traffic and digital advertising revenue in 2016. The Post moved to this new building on Washington's K Street in December 2015. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Donald Trump is seen in New York in 1991, the year of a phone call in which Trump allegedly posed as his own spokesman. The presidential candidate denied it was him after The Washington Post published the recording. Luiz Ribeiro/AP hide caption

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Luiz Ribeiro/AP

Then-presidential candidate Rick Santorum speaks to reporters in the spin room Jan. 14 after the undercard portion of the Fox Business Network Republican presidential debate in South Carolina. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Spectacle Of Spin: The Post-Debate Room Where The Truth Gets Dizzy

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The Washington Post's Jason Rezaian and his wife, Yeganeh Salehi, during a news conference in Tehran, Iran, on Sept. 10, 2013. They were arrested in July 2014. Salehi has since been freed. Rezaian had his third court hearing Monday. EPA /Landov hide caption

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EPA /Landov

Jeff Bezos, founder and CEO of Amazon.com and soon-to-be owner of The Washington Post, last month in Sun Valley, Idaho. Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

From 'Here & Now': 'Washington Post' executive editor Martin Baron on new owner Jeff Bezos

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After 43 years of having an ombudsman, The Washington Post announced Friday that they are ending the position. Nicholas Kamm/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/Getty Images

A 'Vast Domestic Intelligence Apparatus' Is Watching; Is That OK?

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