climate change climate change

The cost of a pint of beer could rise sharply in the U.S. and other countries because of increased risks from heat and drought, according to a new study that looks at climate change's possible effects on barley crops. Peter Nicholls/Reuters hide caption

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Peter Nicholls/Reuters

The New England Aquarium team searching for right whales, at sunrise in the Bay of Fundy. Johanna Anderson and Kelsey Howe scan the waters while Marianna Hagbloom logs data, Amy Knowlton adjusts a GPS unit, and Brigid McKenna steers the Nereid. Murray Carpenter for NPR hide caption

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Murray Carpenter for NPR

In Changing Climate, Endangered Right Whales Find New Feeding Grounds

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Smog blankets Santiago, Chile, in June. A U.N. report warns that even a 1.5-degree C increase in global temperatures will cause serious changes to weather, sea levels, agriculture and natural eco-systems. Cllaudio Reyes/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Cllaudio Reyes/AFP/Getty Images

A North Carolina resident sits on his staircase earlier this week, staring into the water that surrounded his home after Florence hit Emerald Isle, N.C. Tom Copeland/AP hide caption

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Tom Copeland/AP

Footing The Bill For Climate Change: 'By The End Of The Day, Someone Has To Pay'

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Why are some warnings heard, while others are ignored? Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

The Cassandra Curse: Why We Heed Some Warnings, And Ignore Others

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The champagne grape harvest in northeastern France, like this one near Mailly-Champagne, started early this year due to lack of rain. Francois Nascimbeni/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Francois Nascimbeni/AFP/Getty Images

Champagne Makers Bubble Over A Bumper Crop Caused By European Drought

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A satellite image from Monday shows Hurricane Florence as it travels west and gains strength in the Atlantic Ocean. Hurricanes Isaac and Helene have also formed off the coast of West Africa. NOAA/GOES/Getty Images hide caption

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NOAA/GOES/Getty Images

Climate Change Drives Bigger, Wetter Storms — Storms Like Florence

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Solar panels are mounted on the roof of the Los Angeles Convention Center on September 5. The state's governor has signed a landmark bill setting a goal of 100 percent clean energy for the state's electrical needs, by the year 2045. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Petrochemical facilities in the Houston area are assessing their hurricane preparedness after Hurricane Harvey. This oil refinery reinforced storage tank roofs with geodesic domes — the gray caps on some of the white tanks in the photo — to better withstand a deluge. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Industry Looks For Hurricane Lessons As Climate Changes

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The harvest is bad for German farmers this year as the country has experienced the hottest summer on record and months without rainfall. Christian Ender/Getty Images hide caption

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Christian Ender/Getty Images

German Farmers Struck By Drought Fear Further Damage From Climate Change

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As the climate warms, drought is killing large numbers of trees in California. Scientists are looking to the past to try to understand how the ecosystems of today may be changing. Ashley Cooper/Getty Images hide caption

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Ashley Cooper/Getty Images

To Predict Effects Of Global Warming, Scientists Looked Back 20,000 Years

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Nicolas Hulot, the French environmental minister, departs a weekly Cabinet meeting in Paris in February. "I don't want to give the illusion that my presence in government means we're answering these issues properly," Hulot said in resigning Tuesday. Ludovic Marin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ludovic Marin/AFP/Getty Images

Mario Ramos (left) and wife Tally adjust their umbrellas in Laguna Beach, Calif. The state was among a number of places this summer that experienced their highest temperatures on record. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Sea ice is seen from NASA's Operation IceBridge research aircraft off the northwest coast of Greenland on March 30, 2017. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Some Of The Oldest Ice In The Arctic Is Now Breaking Apart

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James Rees, left, and Nicholas Pinter of the University of California, Davis, gather housing data in the town of Odanah, Wis. Joe Proudman/UC Davis hide caption

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Joe Proudman/UC Davis

Wisconsin Reservation Offers A Climate Success Story And A Warning

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Wild rice grows along the edges of the Kakagon River in Wisconsin. Joe Proudman/Courtesy of University of California Davis hide caption

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Joe Proudman/Courtesy of University of California Davis

Climate Change Threatens Midwest's Wild Rice, A Staple For Native Americans

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