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Dungeness crab like these, caught off the coast of Alaska, have been affected by the neurotoxin domoic acid because of algae blooms in recent years, which makes them unsafe to eat. Michael Melford/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Melford/Getty Images

A power plant near Katowice, Poland, the host city for a major global climate conference that began on Sunday. It is the most important climate meeting since the 2015 Paris climate agreement was signed. Czarek Sokolowski/AP hide caption

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Czarek Sokolowski/AP

High Stakes As International Climate Conference Begins

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A "Yellow Vest" protester waves a French flag in Villefranche-sur-Saone on Saturday, during a demonstration against high fuel prices. Jeff Pachoud/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Pachoud/AFP/Getty Images

Downtown Houston flooded by rain from Hurricane Harvey on Aug. 29, 2017. The buildings in the region exacerbated rainfall from the storm, according to a new study. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

Houston Got Hammered By Hurricane Harvey — And Its Buildings Are Partly To Blame

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In this November 1936 photo from the U.S. Farm Security Administration, a mother, originally from Oklahoma stands with her five children near Fresno, Calif., where she works as a cotton picker. The Dust Bowl led to a massive migration of Midwestern farmers out of the region, many of whom traveled to California in search of jobs. Dorothea Lange/AP hide caption

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Dorothea Lange/AP

The barley used to make beer as we know it may take a hit under climate change, but growers say they are already preparing by planting it farther north in colder locations. Dean Hutton/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Dean Hutton/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The cost of a pint of beer could rise sharply in the U.S. and other countries because of increased risks from heat and drought, according to a new study that looks at climate change's possible effects on barley crops. Peter Nicholls/Reuters hide caption

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Peter Nicholls/Reuters

The New England Aquarium team searching for right whales, at sunrise in the Bay of Fundy. Johanna Anderson and Kelsey Howe scan the waters while Marianna Hagbloom logs data, Amy Knowlton adjusts a GPS unit, and Brigid McKenna steers the Nereid. Murray Carpenter for NPR hide caption

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Murray Carpenter for NPR

In Changing Climate, Endangered Right Whales Find New Feeding Grounds

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Smog blankets Santiago, Chile, in June. A U.N. report warns that even a 1.5-degree C increase in global temperatures will cause serious changes to weather, sea levels, agriculture and natural eco-systems. Cllaudio Reyes/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Cllaudio Reyes/AFP/Getty Images

A North Carolina resident sits on his staircase earlier this week, staring into the water that surrounded his home after Florence hit Emerald Isle, N.C. Tom Copeland/AP hide caption

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Tom Copeland/AP

Footing The Bill For Climate Change: 'By The End Of The Day, Someone Has To Pay'

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Why are some warnings heard, while others are ignored? Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

The Cassandra Curse: Why We Heed Some Warnings, And Ignore Others

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