climate change climate change

After Hurricane Harvey hit the Texas coast in August 2017, the storm stalled over Houston and dumped as much as 60 inches of rain on some parts of the region. Katie Hayes Luke for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

Hurricanes Are Moving More Slowly, Which Means More Damage

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/616814022/617676373" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Scientists find that rice grown under elevated carbon conditions loses substantial amounts of protein, zinc, iron and B vitamins, depending on the variety. Maximilian Stock, Ltd./Getty Images/Passage hide caption

toggle caption
Maximilian Stock, Ltd./Getty Images/Passage

Laura Ogden, Jack Hannan, and Dr. Jones the dog. Courtesy of Laura Ogden hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Laura Ogden

Rewinding & Rewriting: The Alternate Universes in Our Heads

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/612458913/613127761" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People walk through a flooded street in in Miami Beach, Fla., in 2015. The city is eyeing $500 million in infrastructure upgrades, installing 80 new pumps over a decade to redirect floodwaters back to the ocean. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Foreign Investors Shrug Off Miami's Rising Sea Levels

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/611919853/613117685" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On (GRACE-FO) mission, shown in an artist's rendering, will measure tiny fluctuations in Earth's gravitational field to show how water moves around the planet. NASA/JPL hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/JPL

NASA Launching New Satellites To Measure Earth's Lumpy Gravity

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/612980506/613117673" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Austin Steeves packages lobsters after hauling traps on his grandfather's boat in Casco Bay, Portland, Maine. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Warming Waters Push Fish To Cooler Climes, Out Of Some Fishermen's Reach

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/611716731/611869669" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An infrared satellite image shows Hurricane Harvey just prior to making landfall on Aug. 25, 2017. Warm water in the Gulf of Mexico fed heavy rains, according to new research. Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Getty Images

Luminalt solar installers Pam Quan (right) and Walter Morales (left) install solar panels on a roof in San Francisco on Wednesday. The California Energy Commission approved a regulation that would require all new homes in the state to have solar panels. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A dried-out reservoir in Thailand. Taylor Weidman/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Taylor Weidman/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A Temperature Roller Coaster Could Be Coming

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/607800921/607996875" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Vehicles pass during the afternoon commute on Highway 101 in Los Angeles on April 2. California is suing the EPA over a plan to revise fuel efficiency standards for vehicles, weakening Obama-era limits on greenhouse gas emissions. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mario Tama/Getty Images

A 2014 photo shows coral on Australia's Great Barrier Reef. The Australian government is dedicating hundreds of millions of dollars to protecting and researching the reef. William West/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
William West/AFP/Getty Images

There are variations in the appearance of severely bleached corals. Here, the coral displays pink fluorescing tissue signalling heat stress. ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies/ Gergely Torda hide caption

toggle caption
ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies/ Gergely Torda

Climate Change Is Killing Coral On The Great Barrier Reef

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/602995137/604119814" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Thomas Fire advanced toward Santa Barbara County on Dec. 10, 2017, in Carpinteria, Calif. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David McNew/Getty Images

As Climate Costs Grow, Some See A Moneymaking Opportunity

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/603230754/603693200" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Greenland ice sheet, the second largest body of ice in the world which covers roughly 80 percent of the country, has been melting and its glaciers retreating at an accelerated pace in recent years due to warmer temperatures. David Goldman/AP hide caption

toggle caption
David Goldman/AP

"Keep it in the ground" activists protesting the Bayou Bridge Pipeline on February 17, 2018 near Belle Rose, Louisiana. Travis Lux/WWNO hide caption

toggle caption
Travis Lux/WWNO

'Keep It In The Ground' Activists Optimistic Despite Oil Boom

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/589908135/595967467" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Walnut trees at a farm in Byron, Calif. An analysis of nearly 90 studies finds warming temperatures may alter where key crops grow across the state, which provides around two-thirds of America's produce. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David Paul Morris/Bloomberg/Getty Images

In 2012, record heat throughout the U.S. farm belt curtailed crop production like this rotting corn on a farm in Bruceville, Ind. Farmers are now worried that the lack of rainfall this year could start the cycle over again. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images