climate change climate change

The Garzweiler coal mine and power plant near the city of Grevenbroich in western Germany. Plans to expand an open-pit brown coal mine in the eastern German village of Pödelwitz have prompted protests. Martin Meissner/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Martin Meissner/AP

Germany Bulldozes Old Villages For Coal Despite Lower Emissions Goals

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/635911260/635911261" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A new report finds that 2017 was one of the hottest years ever recorded. Here, a man dives into the sea in Istanbul in July 2017 during a heat wave that caused record temperatures in much of Turkey. Yasin Akgul/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Yasin Akgul/AFP/Getty Images

New technologies and a changing climate are altering the way apples are grown in places like New York's Hudson Valley and across the country. Jake Rajs/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jake Rajs/Getty Images

A Few More Bad Apples: As The Climate Changes, Fruit Growing Does, Too

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/634135514/635047840" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Fisherman Darius Kasprzak searches for cod in the Gulf of Alaska. The cod population there is at its lowest level on record. Annie Feidt for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Annie Feidt for NPR

Gulf Of Alaska Cod Are Disappearing. Blame 'The Blob'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/630918766/640077938" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A woman uses a portable fan to cool herself in Tokyo on Tuesday as Japan suffers from a heat wave. Scientists say extreme weather events will likely happen more often as the planet gets warmer. Martin Bureau/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Martin Bureau/AFP/Getty Images

When The Weather Is Extreme, Is Climate Change To Blame?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/633203732/633544383" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Verizon crews pump water from an access tunnel in Manhattan in 2012 after flooding from Superstorm Sandy knocked out underground Internet cables. Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images
Marcus Butt / Ikon/Getty Images

Heat Making You Lethargic? Research Shows It Can Slow Your Brain, Too

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/628521596/629362049" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Andrew Wheeler, the Environmental Protection Agency's deputy and soon-to-be acting administrator Courtesy Eric Vance/USEPA/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy Eric Vance/USEPA/Reuters

Get To Know Andrew Wheeler, Ex-Coal Lobbyist With Inside Track To Lead EPA

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/626525274/626664267" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide would lead to a decrease in the nutritional content of many foods, such as rice, seen here growing in Malaysia. Nik Wheeler/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Nik Wheeler/Getty Images

Entering the control room at Three Mile Island Unit 1 is like stepping back in time. Except for a few digital screens and new counters, much of the equipment is original to 1974, when the plant began generating electricity. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Brady/NPR

As Nuclear Struggles, A New Generation Of Engineers Is Motivated By Climate Change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/619348584/620471154" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Debris and cars clog the Patapsco River in Ellicott City, Md., after flooding on May 27 that killed one person and destroyed much of the town's Main Street. David McFadden/AP hide caption

toggle caption
David McFadden/AP

More Rain, More Development Spell Disaster For Some U.S. Cities

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/616944110/618975701" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

After Hurricane Harvey hit the Texas coast in August 2017, the storm stalled over Houston and dumped as much as 60 inches of rain on some parts of the region. Katie Hayes Luke for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

Hurricanes Are Moving More Slowly, Which Means More Damage

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/616814022/617676373" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Scientists find that rice grown under elevated carbon conditions loses substantial amounts of protein, zinc, iron and B vitamins, depending on the variety. Maximilian Stock, Ltd./Getty Images/Passage hide caption

toggle caption
Maximilian Stock, Ltd./Getty Images/Passage

Laura Ogden, Jack Hannan, and Dr. Jones the dog. Courtesy of Laura Ogden hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Laura Ogden

Rewinding & Rewriting: The Alternate Universes in Our Heads

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/612458913/613127761" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People walk through a flooded street in in Miami Beach, Fla., in 2015. The city is eyeing $500 million in infrastructure upgrades, installing 80 new pumps over a decade to redirect floodwaters back to the ocean. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Foreign Investors Shrug Off Miami's Rising Sea Levels

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/611919853/613117685" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On (GRACE-FO) mission, shown in an artist's rendering, will measure tiny fluctuations in Earth's gravitational field to show how water moves around the planet. NASA/JPL hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/JPL

NASA Launching New Satellites To Measure Earth's Lumpy Gravity

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/612980506/613117673" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript