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Hurricane Florence made landfall in North Carolina on Sept. 14, 2018. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration forecasts that two to four major hurricanes will form in the Atlantic during the 2019 hurricane season, which begins June 1. Getty Images hide caption

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The 2019 Hurricane Season Will Be 'Near Normal.' But Normal Can Still Be Devastating

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Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison speaks to party supporters flanked by his wife and daughters. Morrison's conservative coalition won a surprise victory in the country's general election. Rick Rycroft/AP hide caption

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Rick Rycroft/AP

Why are some warnings heard, while others are ignored? Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

How To See The Future (No Crystal Ball Needed)

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Hurricane Florence flooded Nichols, S.C., in September 2018. It was the second catastrophic flood in the region in less than two years. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

When '1-In-100-Year' Floods Happen Often, What Should You Call Them?

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"Nature is declining globally at rates unprecedented in human history," a U.N. panel says, reporting that around 1 million species are currently at risk. Here, an endangered hawksbill turtle swims in a Singapore aquarium in 2017. Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images

1 Million Animal And Plant Species Are At Risk Of Extinction, U.N. Report Says

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A Chinese-backed power plant under construction in 2018 in the desert in the Tharparkar district of Pakistan's southern Sindh province. Rizwan Tabassum/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rizwan Tabassum/AFP/Getty Images

Why Is China Placing A Global Bet On Coal?

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Pedestrians walk in Brooklyn on an unseasonably warm afternoon in February 2017, when temperatures reached near 60 degrees. To take action against climate change, New York City is requiring large buildings to retrofit their structures to improve energy efficiency. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

To Fight Climate Change, New York City Will Push Skyscrapers To Slash Emissions

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Activists call for government action on climate change in the middle of Oxford Circus on Wednesday in London. Now in their third day of action, protests have blocked a number of key junctions in central London. Leon Neal/Getty Images hide caption

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Leon Neal/Getty Images

Workers repair the roof of a small shop while a woman hangs clothing to dry among debris in Beira, Mozambique. The city was badly damaged after Cyclone Idai hit on March 14. Guillem Sartorio/Getty Images hide caption

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Guillem Sartorio/Getty Images

He Thought His City Was Prepared For Big Storms. Then Cyclone Idai Hit

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Cheryl Holder takes a patient's vitals in Miami on March 18. Maria Alejandra Cardona for NPR hide caption

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Maria Alejandra Cardona for NPR

In Florida, Doctors See Climate Change Hurting Their Most Vulnerable Patients

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Sen. Edward Markey, D- Mass., speaks at a rally for the Green New Deal on Tuesday outside the Capitol in Washington. The deal failed to advance in the Senate. Matthew Daly/AP hide caption

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Matthew Daly/AP

Senate Blocks Green New Deal, But Climate Change Emerges As Key 2020 Issue

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Daniel and Helen Pemberton support the huge solar farm planned in Spotsylvania County. They already have 40 solar panels in their own yard. Jacob Fenston/WAMU hide caption

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Jacob Fenston/WAMU

A Battle Is Raging Over The Largest Solar Farm East Of The Rockies

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German ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst took this image of the Earth reflecting light from the sun while aboard the International Space Station July 17, 2014. Alexander Gerst/ESA/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Gerst/ESA/Getty Images