climate change climate change

New technologies that replace the traditional bucket and tap method of getting sap from sugar maples may help combat climate change's effect on the trees. Brianna Soukup/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

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Brianna Soukup/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images

Ben Raines, an environmental reporter for AL.com, holds pieces of wood he collected from a cypress forest discovered in the depths of the Gulf of Mexico. A scientist says having an intact forest from the ice age is rare. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

Scientists: Long-Buried Ice Age Forest Offers Climate Change Clues

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Scientists are hoping that seagrasses could act as a buffer against acidifying oceans. Lauren Sommer/KQED hide caption

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Lauren Sommer/KQED

Can Seagrass Save Shellfish From Climate Change?

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California Gov. Jerry Brown delivers his State of the State Address at the Capitol in Sacramento on Jan. 25, 2018. Andrew Nixon/Capital Public Radio hide caption

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Andrew Nixon/Capital Public Radio

Jerry Brown's Last State Of The State Mixes Optimism And Warnings

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Varham Muradyan for NPR

Are There Zombie Viruses In The Thawing Permafrost?

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Waves crash onto the beach near Brighton Pier in England, in January 2007. Gale force winds and heavy rain brought disruption to large parts of the country. Severe weather events like this one may be linked to more frequent fluctuations in the polar jet stream, according to a new study. Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

A head of poor-quality malt barley taken directly from a field in Power, Mont. Heat and a lack of water resulted in small and light kernels. Grain rejected for malt barley often ends up as animal feed. Tony Bynum/Food & Environment Reporting Network hide caption

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Tony Bynum/Food & Environment Reporting Network

Hurricane Harvey put vast swaths of Texas under water. Elsewhere, fires, tornadoes and extreme weather caused hundreds of billions in damages. Emily Kask/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Emily Kask/AFP/Getty Images

New Report Shows Weather Disasters In 2017 Cost More Than $300 Billion

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Corals around the world have been dying because of warming waters and pollution. Some researchers hope they can reverse the trend by growing new corals in the lab. Albert Kok/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Albert Kok/Wikimedia Commons

As Corals Wither Around The World, Scientists Try IVF

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An Indonesian farmer passes a field as Mount Sinabung volcano spews thick smoke into the air in Karo, North Sumatra, earlier this month. The volcano roared back to life in 2010 for the first time in 400 years. After another period of inactivity it erupted once more in 2013, and it has remained highly active since. Ivan Damanik/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ivan Damanik/AFP/Getty Images

During a storm, the Alaskan village of Newtok can lose 10 to 20 feet of tundra. Erosion is getting worse because of warming temperatures and record low sea ice. Rachel Waldholz/Alaska's Energy Desk hide caption

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Rachel Waldholz/Alaska's Energy Desk

For Alaskan Coastal Village, Erosion Hits Home

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Seeking to cut greenhouse gas emissions in California by 40 percent by 2030, state regulators have approved a plan that offers incentives for truck and bus fleets to go green. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

California's New Climate Plan Uses Incentives To Cut Vehicle Emissions

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Archaeologists are excavating an ancient cabin at the Rising Whale site. Cape Espenberg Birnirk Project hide caption

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Cape Espenberg Birnirk Project

How To Survive Climate Change? Clues Are Buried In The Arctic

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The midnight sun shines across sea ice along the Northwest Passage in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, July 23, 2017. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

'They'll All Be Gone': Video Of Starving Polar Bear Highlights Effects Of Melting Ice

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