natural gas natural gas

Bill Pentak of Panda Power Funds (left), Plant Manager John Martin (center) and Construction Manager Rob Risher (right) stand in front of the construction site for the new Panda Liberty gas power plant in Towanda, Penn. The plant, expected to come online in early 2016, was deliberately sited on top of the Marcellus Shale to take advantage of the cheap, abundant gas. Marie Cusick/WITF hide caption

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Marie Cusick/WITF

How Fracking Is Fueling A Power Shift From Coal To Gas

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At an October protest, hundreds of "We Are Seneca Lake" members block the gates of Crestwood Midstream to protest against the expansion of fracked gas storage in the Finger Lakes. PR Newswire/AP hide caption

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PR Newswire/AP

Residents Fight To Block Fracked Gas In New York's Finger Lakes

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Pump jacks and wells work in an oil field on the Monterey Shale formation in California. Economist Michael Porter says that hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is a "game changer" for the U.S. economy. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

America's Next Economic Boom Could Be Lying Underground

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Workers use perforating tools to create fractures in rock. An EPA study finds that "fracking" to reach and extract deep pockets of hydrocarbons has not caused widespread drinking water pollution. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Brennan Linsley/AP

EPA Finds No Widespread Drinking Water Pollution From Fracking

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Students at the Pennsylvania College of Technology are learning a technique called "tripping pipe," moving a pipe from a stack into a horizontal position and lowering it down into a well. The students train on a practice drilling rig to learn how to be roustabouts. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

In Pennsylvania, Employment Booms Amid Oil And Natural Gas Bust

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Opponents of fracking protested in January at the inauguration of Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Fracking Opponents Feel Police Pressure In Some Drilling Hotspots

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Pipes for TransCanada's planned Keystone XL pipeline are stored in Gascoyne, N.D. The U.S. House has voted to approve the proposed project, which would allow crude oil to flow from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico. The Senate plans to vote Tuesday on legislation that would greenlight the project. Andrew Cullen/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Andrew Cullen/Reuters/Landov

What You Need To Know About The Keystone XL Oil Pipeline

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An engineer oversees the gas distribution system of Hungary's gas pipeline operator FGSZ in Kiskundorozsma, in August. The distributor announced that it would cut off gas supplies to Ukraine. Laszlo Balogh/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Laszlo Balogh/Reuters/Landov

A worker turns a valve at an underground gas storage facility near Striy on Wednesday. Russia has said state-controlled exporter Gazprom will supply China with natural gas via a Siberian pipeline beginning in 2018. Gleb Garanich/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Gleb Garanich/Reuters/Landov

A rendering of the world's largest vessel, the Shell Prelude, which comes in at just over 1,600 feet. It has just left its dry dock in South Korea, where it is being built. It will eventually head toward Australia, where it will be anchored off the coast and used as a liquefied natural gas facility. Shell hide caption

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Shell

An out-of-control natural gas well in the Gulf of Mexico continued to burn Wednesday after it blew out and caught fire. Beams supporting some of the "Hercules 265 jack-up rig" have collapsed. U.S. Coast Guard via AP hide caption

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U.S. Coast Guard via AP

China and India are projected to propel coal's challenge of oil as the world's top energy source within the next five years, according to a new study. Here, a man rides a bicycle toward a coal-fired power station in China's Guangdong province last year. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images