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In Afghanistan, Trump Announces Fresh Taliban Talks

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Australian Timothy Weeks, (left), and American Kevin King were abducted by insurgents in Kabul in August 2016. They are seen here in video stills released by the Taliban in June 2017. EL-EMARA Taliban via AP hide caption

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EL-EMARA Taliban via AP

Afghan peace activists demand an end to war as they arrive in Kabul in June 2018, after marching hundreds of miles from Helmand. Wakil Kohsar/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Wakil Kohsar/AFP via Getty Images

Two women sit, with their faces covered, at a drug treatment center in Kabul, Afghanistan. Musadeq Sadeq/AP hide caption

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Musadeq Sadeq/AP

Women And Children Are The Emerging Face Of Drug Addiction In Afghanistan

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A health worker gives the oral polio vaccine to a child in Karachi, Pakistan. Fareed Khan/AP hide caption

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Fareed Khan/AP

Ghost Viruses And The Taliban Stand In The Way Of Wiping Out Polio

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U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper (center), is greeted by U.S. military personnel upon arriving in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Sunday. Lolita C. Balbor/AP hide caption

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Lolita C. Balbor/AP

A volunteer carries an injured youth to a hospital after an explosion that killed at least 62 people in the Haska Mina district of Nangarhar province Friday. Noorullah Shirzada/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Noorullah Shirzada/AFP via Getty Images

Farahnaz Mohammadi (left) and her cousin Fatima Almi both worry that the gains made by Afghan women since 2001 will be in jeopardy after a U.S.-Taliban deal is signed. Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

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Diaa Hadid/NPR

A Park In Kabul Gives Afghans Respite From The City, If Not From Worries Over Taliban

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Hamdullah Mohib, Afghanistan's national security adviser, speaks during the United Nations General Assembly in New York City on Monday. After U.S.-Taliban talks excluded Afghanistan's government and collapsed last month, Mohib tells NPR that the only way to lasting peace is to include the country's leaders. Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images

The Afghan Government Must Lead Peace Talks, Its National Security Adviser Says

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Afghan workers move ballot boxes to trucks getting ready for Saturday's presidential elections in Kabul, Afghanistan. The lead-up to the vote has been marred by violence and uncertainty. Paula Bronstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Paula Bronstein/Getty Images

The Taliban say the Red Cross may resume its work in Afghanistan, more than five months after threatening the group. In this photo from March, an orthopedic technician walks past artificial limbs in a workshop at the International Committee of the Red Cross hospital for war victims and the disabled in Kabul. Wakil Kohsar /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Wakil Kohsar /AFP/Getty Images

Many Afghans approve of President Trump's decision to quash a potential deal with the Taliban. Here, security forces guard a street in Kabul last week after a suicide car bombing rocked the capital's diplomatic enclave. Sayed Khodaberdi Sadat/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Sayed Khodaberdi Sadat/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

In Afghanistan, A Mix Of Surprise And Relief After Trump Cancels Taliban Talks

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Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan meets U.S. Special Envoy Zalmay Khalilzad (left) in Islamabad on Aug. 1. Khalilzad met Khan ahead of peace talks in Qatar with the Taliban. Press Information Department via AP hide caption

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Press Information Department via AP

The Key Role Pakistan Is Playing In U.S.-Taliban Talks

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First lady Rula Ghani at the Presidential Palace in Kabul, Afghanistan. Earlier this year, she helped free more than 190 Afghan women and girls imprisoned for failing the virginity test after reproductive rights activist Farhad Javid brought it to her attention in October. Kiana Hayeri/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Kiana Hayeri/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Jason Brezler, seated center, holds a meeting with local governors in Afghanistan in 2010. Brezler faced discharge after emailing classified documents over an insecure network. He challenged the Marine Corps' decision. Monique Jaques/Getty Images hide caption

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Monique Jaques/Getty Images

Afghans are seen through a shattered windshield of a bus after an explosion in Kabul, Afghanistan. A suicide car bomber targeted the police headquarters in western Kabul on Wednesday. Rafiq Maqbool/AP hide caption

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Rafiq Maqbool/AP

A destroyed white van sits at the site of an explosion in Kabul, Afghanistan, Monday. A powerful bomb blast tore through the capital, rattling windows, sending smoke billowing from Kabul's downtown area and wounding more than a hundred people. Rahmat Gul/AP hide caption

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Rahmat Gul/AP

Sayeed Rehman, a 5-year-old Afghan boy, was delighted to get a new prosthetic leg that fits his growing body. His leg was amputated after he was caught in crossfire as a baby. Ruchi Kumar for NPR hide caption

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Ruchi Kumar for NPR