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Afghanistan

In a Kabul demonstration last week, Afghan protesters carry a coffin with the decapitated body of one of seven Shiite Muslim Hazaras abducted and killed in southern Afghanistan. Officials blamed Afghan militants loyal to ISIS for the killings. Thousands of protesters marched in Kabul to demand justice for the victims, who included a 9-year-old girl. Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images

Protesters march through the Afghan capital of Kabul on Wednesday, carrying the coffins of seven ethnic Hazaras who were allegedly killed by the Taliban. The demonstrators called for justice and for a government that can ensure security in the country. Massoud Hossaini/AP hide caption

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Massoud Hossaini/AP

As worries grow over unemployment and lack of security, many Afghans are trying to go elsewhere. An Afghan National Police officer calls out the names of passport applicants at the passport office in Kabul in August. SHAH MARAI/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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SHAH MARAI/AFP/Getty Images

Anxiety Grows As Conditions Worsen In Afghanistan

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Pakistani villagers dig out their belongings from the rubble of homes destroyed by an earthquake in Shangla in Swat Valley, Pakistan. Naveed Ali/AP hide caption

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Naveed Ali/AP

On the first day of the Soviet withdrawal from Afghanistan in May 1988, an Afghan soldier hands a flag to a departing Soviet soldier in Kabul. "This was the first time journalists had full access to Kabul," Robert Nickelsberg says. It marked his first year covering Afghanistan. "It was a historical turning point for the Cold War and actually foreshadows the chaos that will descend on the country." Courtesy of Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Courtesy of Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images
Alyson Hurt/NPR

Next Year Could Mark The End Of Polio

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Russian President Vladimir Putin (right) greets Syrian President Bashar Assad in the Kremlin in Moscow on Tuesday. It was Assad's first known trip abroad since the Syrian war broke out in 2011. To bolster Assad, Russia recently began bombing opposition groups in Syria. However, Russian efforts to help embattled leaders have often failed. Alexei Druzhinin/AP hide caption

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Alexei Druzhinin/AP

U.S. Army soldiers walk as a NATO helicopter flies overhead at coalition force Forward Operating Base (FOB) Connelly in the Khogyani district in the eastern province of Nangarhar on August 13, 2015. Wakil Kohsar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Wakil Kohsar/AFP/Getty Images

How U.S. Troops Will Exit Afghanistan Remains Unclear

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President Obama salutes prior to boarding Air Force One last Friday. The president entered office saying he would end the U.S. role in the Iraq and Afghan wars. But U.S. forces were sent back to Iraq last year and he announced Thursday that 5,500 American troops would remain in Afghanistan beyond their previously planned departure at the end of 2016. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP