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Sandra Calligaro for NPR

The Ascent Of Afghan Women

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Afghan President Ashraf Ghani at the Blair House in Washington, D.C. Ghani will be meeting with President Obama this week. Emily Jan/NPR hide caption

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Emily Jan/NPR

Ashraf Ghani: U.S. Critical To Afghanistan's Future

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Survivors of an avalanche walk in the Abdullah Khil village of the Dara district of Panjshir province on Sunday. Nearly 200 people have been killed in north Afghanistan in some of the worst avalanches there for 30 years. Omar Sobhani/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Omar Sobhani/Reuters/Landov

U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter (center left) is greeted with a military honor guard as he arrives to meet Afghan President Ashraf Ghani at the Presidential Palace in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Saturday. Jonathan Ernst/AP hide caption

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Jonathan Ernst/AP

Lebanese-born Rula Ghani is Afghanistan's first lady. The wife of newly elected Afghan President Ashraf Ghani has her own office in the presidential palace and intends to play a prominent role in public life. Emily Jan/NPR hide caption

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Emily Jan/NPR

For The First Time, An Afghan First Lady Steps Into The Spotlight

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The poverty in Afghanistan takes a particular toll on children. These youngsters live in a mud-walled home in Kabul's Nasaji Bagrami camp for internally displaced Afghans. In the most dire of circumstances, a parent might abandon or sell a child. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

U.S. Gen. John Campbell (left) and Command Sgt. Maj. Delbert Byers open the Operation Resolute Support flag during a ceremony at the International Security Assistance Force headquarters in Kabul, Afghanistan on Sunday. Massoud Hossaini/AP hide caption

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Massoud Hossaini/AP

After Years Of Conflict, U.S. Mission Shifts In Afghanistan

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Afghan security personnel inspect a damaged bus at the site of a suicide attack in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Saturday. There was no immediate report of casualties, but the attack was one of several in the last 24 hours that have been blamed on the Taliban. Rahmat Gul/AP hide caption

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Rahmat Gul/AP

Afghan laborers work on a road project in Kabul. The city has undertaken a huge project to fix its roads and sewers. Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

Kabul Postcard: A Neighborhood In Transition

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At about $15 a gram, saffron is the world's most expensive spice. Rumi Spice has a unique model of employing Afghan farmers who are growing it that aims to double or even triple their annual income. Cristina Hirschkorn/Courtesy of Rumi Spice hide caption

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Cristina Hirschkorn/Courtesy of Rumi Spice