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U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Chance Henderson, an orthopedic surgeon, stands in the operating theater of the military hospital at Bagram Airfield in Afghanistan. Henderson is fighting to save the leg of a 6-year-old Afghan girl who was shot during a firefight between U.S. and Afghan forces and the Taliban. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Saving 6-Year-Old Ameera, Shot In An Afghan Firefight

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Volunteers stand Saturday near the wreckage of the destroyed vehicle, in which Mullah Akhtar Mansour was allegedly traveling in the Ahmed Wal area in Baluchistan province of Pakistan, near Afghanistan border. Abdul Malik/AP hide caption

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Abdul Malik/AP

U.S. Drone Strike Killed Taliban Leader, White House, Afghan Government Say

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Injured Doctors Without Borders staff find shelter in a safe room after an airstrike on their hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

As War Dangers Multiply, Doctors Without Borders Struggles To Adapt

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U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry (left) meets Tajikistan's President Emomalii Rahmon (right) during a visit to the capital Dushanbe, last Nov. 3. The U.S. and Russia are both concerned about the stability of Tajikistan, where Rahmon, who has ruled for two decades, faces growing opposition from Islamists. Critics say he has used the threat to crack down on a wide range of political opponents. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

President Ashraf Ghani (right) and Chief Executive Abdullah Abdullah (left) leave after signing a power-sharing deal in September 2014 at the presidential palace in Kabul. Afghanistan's National Unity Government is now in disarray. Massoud Hossaini/AP hide caption

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Massoud Hossaini/AP

Zabihuillah Niazi, a 25-year-old nurse, lost an eye and an arm when an American AC-130 gunship shelled the Medecins Sans Frontieres trauma center in Kunduz, Afghanistan, in October 2015, killing 42 people. Zabihullah Tamanna for NPR hide caption

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Zabihullah Tamanna for NPR

On Wednesday, Afghan mourners offer funeral prayers for a victim killed in Tuesday's bomb blast in Kabul. The Taliban said it carried out the brazen assault near the defense ministry, which would mark the first major Taliban attack in the Afghan capital since the insurgents announced the start of this year's fighting season. Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images

Forester Jorgen Andersson clears trees with his horse, not a tractor. He says he'd never thought of taking an Afghan refugee as an apprentice — especially one who'd never been in a forest before. But now, he says, "I'm happy to do that." Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

After Fleeing The Taliban, An Afghan Reinvents Himself In Sweden

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Afghans seeking passports wait in line in Kabul on Jan. 20. Many Afghans are seeking to leave the country, though some have returned from countries like Germany after finding out that they were unlikely to receive asylum. Xinhua News Agency hide caption

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Xinhua News Agency

Feeling Unwanted In Germany, Some Afghan Migrants Head Home

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Murtaza Ahmadi, 5, is the proud new owner of a genuine Lionel Messi jersey. Earlier this year, a photo of the boy wearing a "Messi" jersey made from a plastic bag went viral. Mahdy Mehraeen/UNICEF Afghanistan hide caption

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Mahdy Mehraeen/UNICEF Afghanistan